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The nation's largest landlord : the Bureau of Land Management in the American West / James R. Skillen.

By: Skillen, James R.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Lawrence, Kan. : University Press of Kansas, ©2009. 2015)Description: 1 online resource (xvi, 297 pages :) : maps.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780700622535; 0700622535.Subject(s): National monuments -- West (U.S.) | National parks and reserves -- West (U.S.) | Public lands -- West (U.S.) -- ManagementAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Nation's largest landlord.DDC classification: 333.730978 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
The Bureau of Land Management : enduring tensions of public lands management -- Born into controversy -- The new BLM -- BLM enters the environmental decade -- Political inertia under a new statutory mandate -- BLM in the 1990s : bureau of landscapes and monuments? -- Neosagebrush politics.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HD243.W38 S55 2009 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt1kzcdcq Available ocn966869211

Includes bibliographical references and index.

The Bureau of Land Management : enduring tensions of public lands management -- Born into controversy -- The new BLM -- BLM enters the environmental decade -- Political inertia under a new statutory mandate -- BLM in the 1990s : bureau of landscapes and monuments? -- Neosagebrush politics.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In 1946, President Truman combined the General Land Office and the US Grazing Service, creating the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), still the least-known custodian of federal lands. The BLM is not a minor agency; it manages 256 million acres and has responsibility for 700 million acres of subsurface minerals. In 1946, its responsibilities were mainly to oversee private grazing and mining on federal land. Decades later, environmentalists, sports enthusiasts, and vacationers forced BLM to become a multiple-use custodian. Democratic administrations emphasized environmental sustainability, and Republican administrations emphasized commercial exploitation of resources. BLM personnel were pulled in opposite directions by different parties in power. A tug-of-war also existed among commercial users, environmentalists, Congress, and the courts. Some secretaries of interior and heads of BLM provided helpful leadership and others did not. Here, Skillen (environmental studies, Calvin College) provides a nonpartisan history of BLM actions and interactions. He does for BLM what other environmental historians have done for the US National Park Service and the US Forest Service. This work is well documented with citations to publications, archival sources, and author interviews. A welcome contribution. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All readership levels. F. N. Egerton emeritus, University of Wisconsin--Parkside

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