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The exile's song : Edmond Dédé and the unfinished revolutions of the Atlantic world / Sally McKee.

By: McKee, Sally.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Yale University Press, 2017Description: 1 online resource (271).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 0300224699; 9780300224696.Subject(s): Composers -- United States -- BiographyAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Exile's Song : Edmond Dédé and the Unfinished Revolutions of the Atlantic World.DDC classification: 780.92 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Half-title; Title; Copyright; Contents; Acknowledgments; Chapter 1. Lost; Chapter 2. A Family Long Free; Chapter 3. City of Sound; Chapter 4. City of Dust; Chapter 5. City of Song; Chapter 6. City of Exile; Chapter 7. The Lost Violin; Chapter 8. Found; Notes; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z.
Summary: The extraordinary story of African American composer Edmond Dédé, raised in antebellum New Orleans, and his remarkable career in FranceIn 1855, Edmond Dédé, a free black composer from New Orleans, emigrated to Paris. There he trained with France's best classical musicians and went on to spend thirty-six years in Bordeaux leading the city's most popular orchestras. How did this African American, raised in the biggest slave market in the United States, come to compose ballets for one of the best theaters outside of Paris and gain recognition as one of Bordeaux's most popular orchestra leaders? Beginning with his birth in antebellum New Orleans in 1827 and ending with his death in Paris in 1901, Sally McKee vividly recounts the life of this extraordinary man. From the Crescent City to the City of Light and on to the raucous music halls of Bordeaux, this intimate narrative history brings to life the lost world of exiles and travelers in a rapidly modernizing world that threatened to leave the most vulnerable behind.-- Provided by Publisher.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
ML410.D434 M354 2017 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt1jktq9x Available ocn967392576

Print version record.

Cover; Half-title; Title; Copyright; Contents; Acknowledgments; Chapter 1. Lost; Chapter 2. A Family Long Free; Chapter 3. City of Sound; Chapter 4. City of Dust; Chapter 5. City of Song; Chapter 6. City of Exile; Chapter 7. The Lost Violin; Chapter 8. Found; Notes; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z.

The extraordinary story of African American composer Edmond Dédé, raised in antebellum New Orleans, and his remarkable career in FranceIn 1855, Edmond Dédé, a free black composer from New Orleans, emigrated to Paris. There he trained with France's best classical musicians and went on to spend thirty-six years in Bordeaux leading the city's most popular orchestras. How did this African American, raised in the biggest slave market in the United States, come to compose ballets for one of the best theaters outside of Paris and gain recognition as one of Bordeaux's most popular orchestra leaders? Beginning with his birth in antebellum New Orleans in 1827 and ending with his death in Paris in 1901, Sally McKee vividly recounts the life of this extraordinary man. From the Crescent City to the City of Light and on to the raucous music halls of Bordeaux, this intimate narrative history brings to life the lost world of exiles and travelers in a rapidly modernizing world that threatened to leave the most vulnerable behind.-- Provided by Publisher.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Dédé (1827-1901) was one of the only 19th-century African Americans to build a career as a composer and conductor of European classical music. Born in antebellum New Orleans, he struggled to establish himself at home and in Mexico City before emigrating and working for decades in musical theaters and cafés in Bordeaux. McKee (history, Univ. of California, Davis) places Dédé at the center of her narrative, but his story forms only part of her discussion of, as she writes in chapter 1, "expatriates and refugees of color in the nineteenth-century Atlantic world." Each chapter reconstructs social contexts and introduces other African Americans in situations similar to Dédé's. Chapter 2, for example, rehearses the history of free black populations and the composer's family in and around New Orleans. Chapter 3 illuminates Dédé's musical training by reviewing New Orleans's unique musical life. Chapter 6 considers the social and political experiences of Dédé and other expatriates following the Civil War to tease out the "unfulfilled promises of the Atlantic revolutions." Recordings of Dédé's compositions are rare, but his surviving sheet music and manuscripts could have been consulted to expand discussion of his music. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower- and upper-division undergraduates, graduate students, general readers. --Stanley Clyde Pelkey, Florida State University

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