Japanese war criminals : the politics of justice after the Second World War / Sandra Wilson, Robert Cribb, Beatrice Trefalt, and Dean Aszkielowicz.

By: Wilson, Sandra, 1957- [author.]Contributor(s): Cribb, R. B [author.] | Trefalt, Beatrice [author.] | Aszkielowicz, Dean [author.]Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: New York : Columbia University Press, [2017]Description: 1 online resource (xv, 417 pages) : illustrations, mapsContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780231542685; 0231542682Subject(s): War crimes -- Japan | War crime trials -- Japan | War criminals -- JapanAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Japanese war criminals.DDC classification: 341.6/90268 LOC classification: KZ1181 | .W55 2017Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Defining war crimes and creating courts -- Investigation and arrest -- In court : indictment, trial, and sentencing -- Dilemmas of detention and the first misgivings -- Shifting mood, shifting location -- Peace and Article 11 -- Japanese pressure mounts -- Finding a formula for release -- The race to clear Sugamo.
Summary: Beginning in late 1945, the United States, Britain, China, Australia, France, the Netherlands, and later the Philippines, the Soviet Union, and the People's Republic of China convened national courts to prosecute Japanese military personnel for war crimes. The defendants included ethnic Koreans and Taiwanese who had served with the armed forces as Japanese subjects. In Tokyo, the International Military Tribunal for the Far East tried Japanese leaders. While the fairness of these trials has been a focus for decades, Japanese War Criminals instead argues that the most important issues arose outside the courtroom. What was the legal basis for identifying and detaining subjects, determining who should be prosecuted, collecting evidence, and granting clemency after conviction' The answers to these questions helped set the norms for transitional justice in the postwar era and today contribute to strategies for addressing problematic areas of international law. Examining the complex moral, ethical, legal, and political issues surrounding the Allied prosecution project, from the first investigations during the war to the final release of prisoners in 1958, Japanese War Criminals shows how a simple effort to punish the guilty evolved into a multidimensional struggle that muddied the assignment of criminal responsibility for war crimes. Over time, indignation in Japan over Allied military actions, particularly the deployment of the atomic bombs, eclipsed anger over Japanese atrocities, and, among the Western powers, new Cold War imperatives took hold. This book makes a unique contribution to our understanding of the construction of the postwar international order in Asia and to our comprehension of the difficulties of implementing transitional justice.
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KZ1181 .W55 2017 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7312/wils17922 Available ocn967682563

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Defining war crimes and creating courts -- Investigation and arrest -- In court : indictment, trial, and sentencing -- Dilemmas of detention and the first misgivings -- Shifting mood, shifting location -- Peace and Article 11 -- Japanese pressure mounts -- Finding a formula for release -- The race to clear Sugamo.

Print version record.

Beginning in late 1945, the United States, Britain, China, Australia, France, the Netherlands, and later the Philippines, the Soviet Union, and the People's Republic of China convened national courts to prosecute Japanese military personnel for war crimes. The defendants included ethnic Koreans and Taiwanese who had served with the armed forces as Japanese subjects. In Tokyo, the International Military Tribunal for the Far East tried Japanese leaders. While the fairness of these trials has been a focus for decades, Japanese War Criminals instead argues that the most important issues arose outside the courtroom. What was the legal basis for identifying and detaining subjects, determining who should be prosecuted, collecting evidence, and granting clemency after conviction' The answers to these questions helped set the norms for transitional justice in the postwar era and today contribute to strategies for addressing problematic areas of international law. Examining the complex moral, ethical, legal, and political issues surrounding the Allied prosecution project, from the first investigations during the war to the final release of prisoners in 1958, Japanese War Criminals shows how a simple effort to punish the guilty evolved into a multidimensional struggle that muddied the assignment of criminal responsibility for war crimes. Over time, indignation in Japan over Allied military actions, particularly the deployment of the atomic bombs, eclipsed anger over Japanese atrocities, and, among the Western powers, new Cold War imperatives took hold. This book makes a unique contribution to our understanding of the construction of the postwar international order in Asia and to our comprehension of the difficulties of implementing transitional justice.

In English.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

For years, writers focused on the German war crime trials that followed WW II, and in the process overlooked the treatment of Japanese war crimes. Now, Sandra Wilson, Robert Cribb, Beatrice Trefalt, and Dean Aszkielowicz have filled that void with this study. The authors, all of whom teach at Australian universities, are versed in the diplomatic and legal machinations that brought the Japanese to the bar of justice. The authors highlight the fates not only of officers, but also of NCOs and enlisted personal for violations of wartime norms. Many readers may be familiar with the Tokyo trials of the major Japanese war criminals, or the trial of General Tomoyuki Yamashita in the Philippines, but many more know virtually nothing of the trials in Hong Kong, Singapore, Morotai, Manila, and Saigon run by the British, French, Americans, Dutch, and Chinese. As happened in Europe during the early Cold War, the Anglo-Americans were willing to soften their stance concerning Japanese wartime violations in return for a dependable ally. A groundbreaking work that makes a significant contribution to current WW II scholarship. Summing Up: Essential. All levels/libraries. --Christopher C. Lovett, Emporia State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Robert Cribb is the author of Wild Man from Borneo: A Cultural History of the Orangutan which made the NSW Premier¿s History Awards 2015 shortlists in the category of General History.

(Bowker Author Biography)

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