Normal view MARC view ISBD view

The new eugenics : selective breeding in an era of reproductive technologies / Judith Daar.

By: Daar, Judith.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: [Place of publication not identified] : Yale University Press : Yale University Press, 2017Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780300229035; 0300229038.Subject(s): Human reproductive technology -- Law and legislation -- United States | Human reproductive technology -- Social aspects -- United States | Discrimination in medical care -- Law and legislation -- United States | Discrimination in medical care -- United StatesDDC classification: 346.7301/7 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
The reproductive revolution -- Our eugenics past -- The high cost of assisted reproduction -- Race and ethnicity as barriers to ART access -- Social infertility and the quest for parenthood -- Disability and procreative diminishment -- The harms of procreative deprivation -- The new eugenics.
Summary: "Eugenics, the effort to improve the human species by inhibiting reproduction of 'inferior' genetic strains, ultimately came to be regarded as the great shame of the Progressive movement. Judith Daar, a prominent expert on the intersection of law and medicine, argues that current attitudes toward the potential users of modern assisted reproductive technologies threaten to replicate eugenics' same discriminatory practices. In this book, Daar asserts how barriers that block certain people's access to reproductive technologies are often founded on biases rooted in notions of class, race, and marital status. As a result, poor, minority, unmarried, disabled, and LGBT individuals are denied technologies available to well off nonminority heterosexual applicants. An original argument on a highly emotional and important issue, this work offers a surprising departure from more familiar arguments on the issue as it warns physicians, government agencies, and the general public against repeating the mistakes of the past"--Book jacket.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
KF3830 .D325 2017 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt1kgqwrv Available ocn971018863

Vendor-supplied metadata.

The reproductive revolution -- Our eugenics past -- The high cost of assisted reproduction -- Race and ethnicity as barriers to ART access -- Social infertility and the quest for parenthood -- Disability and procreative diminishment -- The harms of procreative deprivation -- The new eugenics.

"Eugenics, the effort to improve the human species by inhibiting reproduction of 'inferior' genetic strains, ultimately came to be regarded as the great shame of the Progressive movement. Judith Daar, a prominent expert on the intersection of law and medicine, argues that current attitudes toward the potential users of modern assisted reproductive technologies threaten to replicate eugenics' same discriminatory practices. In this book, Daar asserts how barriers that block certain people's access to reproductive technologies are often founded on biases rooted in notions of class, race, and marital status. As a result, poor, minority, unmarried, disabled, and LGBT individuals are denied technologies available to well off nonminority heterosexual applicants. An original argument on a highly emotional and important issue, this work offers a surprising departure from more familiar arguments on the issue as it warns physicians, government agencies, and the general public against repeating the mistakes of the past"--Book jacket.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Embryonic screening allows prospective parents to view the genetic makeup of embryos. Such screening can reveal over 250 genetic abnormalities, affording parents greater control over reproduction and the power to prevent transfer of life-threatening genetic diseases. Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) has been criticized for eugenic potential. At the most basic level, eugenics is the manipulation of otherwise natural reproduction. Eugenic movements of the early and mid-twentieth centuries acted to prevent the "unworthy" from reproducing, while encouraging those with desirable traits to reproduce. Daar (UC-Irvine) considers the historical perspective of these American eugenics movements through her discussion of modern reproductive technology. This impressively researched book with extensive endnotes begins with a discussion of eugenic history in America and considers the social, political, cultural, and ethical aspects of ART across seven impressively well-written chapters. The New Eugenics is "an anthem for the democratization of ART," offering readers a set of recommendations to dismantle inequalities to access, knowledge, and use of ART in America. This is a must-read for students and scholars of reproduction in the medical humanities, bioethics, genetic counseling, and medical sociology. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. --Margaret L. Charleroy, University of Minnesota

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.