The man who knew infinity : a life of the genius Ramanujan / Robert Kanigel.

By: Kanigel, Robert [author.]Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Washington Square Press , 2016Edition: Washington Square Press trade paperback editionDescription: x, 438 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations, portraits, maps ; 21 cmContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781476763491; 1476763496Subject(s): Mathematicians -- India -- Biography | Mathematicians -- Great Britain -- BiographyDDC classification: 510/.92 LOC classification: QA29.R3 | K36 2016
Contents:
One. In The Temple's Coolness/1887 to 1903 -- 1. Dakshin Gange -- 2. Sarangapani Sannidhi Street -- 3. A Brahmin Boyhood -- 4. Off-scale -- 5. The Goddess of Namakkal -- Two. Ranging With Delight/1903 to 1908 -- 1. The Book of Carr -- 2. The Cambridge of South India -- 3. Flight -- 4. Another Try -- 5. The Notebooks -- 6. A Thought of God -- 7. Enough is Enough -- Three. The Search For Patrons/1908 to 1913 -- 1. Janaki -- 2. Door-to-Door -- 3. "Leisure" in Madras -- 4. Jacob Bernoulli and His Numbers -- 5. The Port Trust -- 6. The British Raj -- 7. The Letter -- Four. Hardy/G. H. Hardy to 1913 -- 1. Forever Young -- 2. Horseshoe Lane -- 3. Flint and Stone -- 4. A Fellow of Trinity -- 5. "The Magic Air" -- 6. The Hardy School -- Five. "I Beg To Introduce Myself ... "/1913 to 1914 -- 1. The Letter -- 2. "I Have Found in You a Friend ..." -- 3. "Does Ramanujan Know Polish?" -- 4. A Dream at Namakkal -- 5. At the Dock -- Six. Ramanujan's Spring/1914 to 1916 -- 1. Out of India -- 2. Together -- 3. The flames of Louvain -- 4. The zeroes of the zeta function -- 5. S. Ramanujan, B.A. -- Seven. The English Chill/1916 to 1918 -- 1. High table -- 2. An Indian in England -- 3. "A singularly happy collaboration" -- 4. Deepening the hole -- 5. "All us big steamers" -- 6. The Danish phenomenon -- 7. Trouble back home -- 8. The Nelson monument -- 9. Ramanujan, mathematics, and God -- 10. Singularities at X = 1 -- 11. Slipped from memory -- Eight. "In Somewhat Indifferent Health"/from 1918 -- 1. "All the world seemed young again" -- 2. Return to the cauvery -- 3. The final problem -- 4. A son of India -- 5. Ramanujan reborn -- 6. Better blast furnaces? -- 7. Svayambhu.
Summary: A biography of the Indian mathematician Srinivasa Ramanujan. The book gives a detailed account of his upbringing in India, his mathematical achievements, and his mathematical collaboration with English mathematician G.H. Hardy. The book also reviews the life of Hardy and the academic culture of Cambridge University during the early twentieth century.
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Includes bibliographical references (pages 417-423) and index.

One. In The Temple's Coolness/1887 to 1903 -- 1. Dakshin Gange -- 2. Sarangapani Sannidhi Street -- 3. A Brahmin Boyhood -- 4. Off-scale -- 5. The Goddess of Namakkal -- Two. Ranging With Delight/1903 to 1908 -- 1. The Book of Carr -- 2. The Cambridge of South India -- 3. Flight -- 4. Another Try -- 5. The Notebooks -- 6. A Thought of God -- 7. Enough is Enough -- Three. The Search For Patrons/1908 to 1913 -- 1. Janaki -- 2. Door-to-Door -- 3. "Leisure" in Madras -- 4. Jacob Bernoulli and His Numbers -- 5. The Port Trust -- 6. The British Raj -- 7. The Letter -- Four. Hardy/G. H. Hardy to 1913 -- 1. Forever Young -- 2. Horseshoe Lane -- 3. Flint and Stone -- 4. A Fellow of Trinity -- 5. "The Magic Air" -- 6. The Hardy School -- Five. "I Beg To Introduce Myself ... "/1913 to 1914 -- 1. The Letter -- 2. "I Have Found in You a Friend ..." -- 3. "Does Ramanujan Know Polish?" -- 4. A Dream at Namakkal -- 5. At the Dock -- Six. Ramanujan's Spring/1914 to 1916 -- 1. Out of India -- 2. Together -- 3. The flames of Louvain -- 4. The zeroes of the zeta function -- 5. S. Ramanujan, B.A. -- Seven. The English Chill/1916 to 1918 -- 1. High table -- 2. An Indian in England -- 3. "A singularly happy collaboration" -- 4. Deepening the hole -- 5. "All us big steamers" -- 6. The Danish phenomenon -- 7. Trouble back home -- 8. The Nelson monument -- 9. Ramanujan, mathematics, and God -- 10. Singularities at X = 1 -- 11. Slipped from memory -- Eight. "In Somewhat Indifferent Health"/from 1918 -- 1. "All the world seemed young again" -- 2. Return to the cauvery -- 3. The final problem -- 4. A son of India -- 5. Ramanujan reborn -- 6. Better blast furnaces? -- 7. Svayambhu.

A biography of the Indian mathematician Srinivasa Ramanujan. The book gives a detailed account of his upbringing in India, his mathematical achievements, and his mathematical collaboration with English mathematician G.H. Hardy. The book also reviews the life of Hardy and the academic culture of Cambridge University during the early twentieth century.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

This biography traces the life of one of the greatest geniuses of the 20th century, Ramanujan. This incredibly brilliant Indian mathematician, working alone in relative obscurity and lacking the usual academic credentials, could easily have passed unnoticed. However, with the help of a handful of friends and the ultimate support of renowned English mathematician G.H. Hardy, his work was brought to the attention of the world. When he died in 1920 at 32 he had become a folk-hero in his own country. He left a rich lode of original mathematics, which is still being mined today. This extremely well-researched and well-written biography is a ``must'' addition to any library collection.-- Harold D. Shane, Baruch Coll., CUNY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

The tradition of mathematical creativity is very ancient in India. Its most brilliant embodiment in modern times was the inscrutable genius, Srinivasa Ramanujan. The mathematical output of this extraordinary human being is staggering by any standards, and the story of his life is fascinating. Born into a modest family in a remote town in the South of India, Ramanujan was brought up in traditional religious lore and practice and condemned to a clerkship in a boring government establishment. Our hero reveled in numbers since childhood, was obsessed with esoteric mathematical formulas, wrote papers on topics like partition functions, and (thanks to helpful individuals) began a correspondence with the eminent British mathematician G.H. Hardy, which resulted in the harvest of his full potential for the world at large to admire and benefit from. Ramanujan had an all-too-brief life, rising and vanishing like some mysterious comet whose trail is to last for as long as civilization on our planet. His story is told delightfully, with understanding and sensitivity, in this superb biography of a man who shines like an exotic gem in the treasure chest of human achievements. In this well-researched work readers also get glimpses of related matters, such as personalities in the Cambridge establishment, the WW I debates in British academia, the village goddess who gave Ramanujan the okay to cross the seas and go to England, and the not-so-happy aspects of the hero's life. A book with all the fantasy of a historical novel, where East and West meet and mingle in the grand arena of mathematics.-V. V. Raman, Rochester Institute of Technology

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Robert Kanigel teaches at MIT and lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

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