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Regulatory Rights : Supreme Court Activism, the Public Interest, and the Making of Constitutional Law

By: Yackle, Larry.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (274 p.).ISBN: 9780226944739.Subject(s): Civil rights -- United States | Constitutional law -- United States | Police power -- United States | United States. -- Supreme CourtGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Regulatory Rights : Supreme Court Activism, the Public Interest, and the Making of Constitutional LawDDC classification: 342.73 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction -- 1. The Documentary Constitution -- Constitutional Law -- Explanations -- The Constancy of a Writing -- The Legitimacy of a Compact -- A Constitution Made by Judges -- Textualism -- Yawning Gaps -- Vague and Ambiguous Terms -- The Analogy to Statutes -- The Text Writ Large -- The Text in Context -- Negative Examples -- Originalism -- The Framers -- The Founding Generation -- More Negative Examples -- 2. Constitutional Common Law -- Rights -- Natural Rights -- Rights and Formalism -- The Positive Present -- Markets -- The Unregulated Baseline
The Regulatory Present -- The Public Interest -- Natural Rights (Again) -- The Police Power -- Formalism (Again) -- Laissez-Faire -- Class Legislation -- Efficiency and Elections -- 3. Regulatory Rights -- Preliminaries -- Restraints Neither Internal nor External -- Regulatory Rights in the Literature -- Due Process -- The Substance of Process -- Market Freedom -- Fundamental Interests -- Procedural Rights -- Substantive Rights -- Beyond the Bill of Rights -- Abusive Behavior -- Equal Protection -- Equality and Purpose -- The Overlap with Due Process -- Classifications
Ordinary Classifications -- Fundamental Interests (Again) -- Suspicious Classifications -- Freedom of Expression -- Free Speech -- Freedom of Religion -- Cruel and Unusual Punishments -- 4. Rational Instrumentalism -- Standards of Review -- The Rational-Basis Test -- Close Scrutiny -- Means -- The Level-of-Generality Question -- Disproportionate Impact -- Knowing a Means by Its Purpose -- Individual Interests -- Rights (Again) -- The Level-of-Generality Question (Again) -- Ends -- The Search for Purpose -- Techniques -- Illustrations -- A Purpose to Work With -- Compelling Objectives
Impermissible Explanations -- Tautological Ends -- Of Conduct and Status -- Conclusion -- Notes -- Index
Summary: We often hear-with particular frequency during recent Supreme Court nomination hearings-that justices should not create constitutional rights, but should instead enforce the rights that the Constitution enshrines. In Regulatory Rights, Larry Yackle sets out to convince readers that such arguments fundamentally misconceive both the work that justices do and the character of the American Constitution in whose name they do it.  It matters who sits on the Supreme Court, he argues, precisely because justices do create individual constitutional rights. Traversing a wide range of Supreme Court decisi
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
KF4552 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=408436 Available EBL408436

Contents -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction -- 1. The Documentary Constitution -- Constitutional Law -- Explanations -- The Constancy of a Writing -- The Legitimacy of a Compact -- A Constitution Made by Judges -- Textualism -- Yawning Gaps -- Vague and Ambiguous Terms -- The Analogy to Statutes -- The Text Writ Large -- The Text in Context -- Negative Examples -- Originalism -- The Framers -- The Founding Generation -- More Negative Examples -- 2. Constitutional Common Law -- Rights -- Natural Rights -- Rights and Formalism -- The Positive Present -- Markets -- The Unregulated Baseline

The Regulatory Present -- The Public Interest -- Natural Rights (Again) -- The Police Power -- Formalism (Again) -- Laissez-Faire -- Class Legislation -- Efficiency and Elections -- 3. Regulatory Rights -- Preliminaries -- Restraints Neither Internal nor External -- Regulatory Rights in the Literature -- Due Process -- The Substance of Process -- Market Freedom -- Fundamental Interests -- Procedural Rights -- Substantive Rights -- Beyond the Bill of Rights -- Abusive Behavior -- Equal Protection -- Equality and Purpose -- The Overlap with Due Process -- Classifications

Ordinary Classifications -- Fundamental Interests (Again) -- Suspicious Classifications -- Freedom of Expression -- Free Speech -- Freedom of Religion -- Cruel and Unusual Punishments -- 4. Rational Instrumentalism -- Standards of Review -- The Rational-Basis Test -- Close Scrutiny -- Means -- The Level-of-Generality Question -- Disproportionate Impact -- Knowing a Means by Its Purpose -- Individual Interests -- Rights (Again) -- The Level-of-Generality Question (Again) -- Ends -- The Search for Purpose -- Techniques -- Illustrations -- A Purpose to Work With -- Compelling Objectives

Impermissible Explanations -- Tautological Ends -- Of Conduct and Status -- Conclusion -- Notes -- Index

We often hear-with particular frequency during recent Supreme Court nomination hearings-that justices should not create constitutional rights, but should instead enforce the rights that the Constitution enshrines. In Regulatory Rights, Larry Yackle sets out to convince readers that such arguments fundamentally misconceive both the work that justices do and the character of the American Constitution in whose name they do it.  It matters who sits on the Supreme Court, he argues, precisely because justices do create individual constitutional rights. Traversing a wide range of Supreme Court decisi

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Larry Yackle is professor of law and the Basil Yanakakis Research Scholar at Boston University School of Law. He is the author of several books, including Reclaiming the Federal Court s and Reform and Regret . <br> <br>

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