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The Foreign Policy Disconnect : What Americans Want from Our Leaders but Don't Get

By: Page, Benjamin I.
Contributor(s): Bouton, Marshall M.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.American Politics and Political Economy Series: Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (369 p.).ISBN: 9780226644592.Subject(s): Public opinion -- United States | United States -- Foreign relations -- 2001-2009 -- Decision making | United States -- Foreign relations -- 2001-2009 -- Public opinionGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Foreign Policy Disconnect : What Americans Want from Our Leaders but Don't GetDDC classification: 327.73 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents -- Illustrations -- Preface -- Introduction: What Sort of Foreign Policy? -- Taking Public Opinion Seriously -- The Goals of Security and Justice -- Friends and Foes in the World -- Military Strength and the Use of Force -- Political Cooperation -- Economic Well-Being and Economic Justice -- A Disconnect between Policy Makers and the Public? -- Conclusion: Foreign Policy and Democracy -- Appendix. How Goals Cluster -- Notes -- References -- Index
Summary: With world affairs so troubled, what kind of foreign policy should the United States pursue? Benjamin Page and Marshall Bouton look for answers in a surprising place: among the American people. Drawing on a series of national surveys conducted between 1974 and 2004, Page and Bouton reveal that-contrary to conventional wisdom-Americans generally hold durable, coherent, and sensible opinions about foreign policy. Nonetheless, their opinions often stand in opposition to those of policymakers, usually because of different interests and values, rather than superior wisdom among the elite. The Forei
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Contents -- Illustrations -- Preface -- Introduction: What Sort of Foreign Policy? -- Taking Public Opinion Seriously -- The Goals of Security and Justice -- Friends and Foes in the World -- Military Strength and the Use of Force -- Political Cooperation -- Economic Well-Being and Economic Justice -- A Disconnect between Policy Makers and the Public? -- Conclusion: Foreign Policy and Democracy -- Appendix. How Goals Cluster -- Notes -- References -- Index

With world affairs so troubled, what kind of foreign policy should the United States pursue? Benjamin Page and Marshall Bouton look for answers in a surprising place: among the American people. Drawing on a series of national surveys conducted between 1974 and 2004, Page and Bouton reveal that-contrary to conventional wisdom-Americans generally hold durable, coherent, and sensible opinions about foreign policy. Nonetheless, their opinions often stand in opposition to those of policymakers, usually because of different interests and values, rather than superior wisdom among the elite. The Forei

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Page (Northwestern Univ.) and Bouton (Chicago Council on Foreign Relations) employ 30 years of public opinion surveys and sophisticated multiple regression analysis to challenge the oft-asserted claim that the American public is ill informed, inconsistent, and capricious in foreign policy matters. They determine that the American public has stable, consistent, and sensible preferences over a wide range of issues and coherent, logical, sound belief systems to justify their views. The authors assert that the populace desires cooperative, multilateral foreign policies with high priority on economic and social security at home and justice abroad. Yet policy makers emphasize security issues and recently, unilateral approaches. The authors conclude that policy makers should pay greater attention to the public's desires. The book is written for several audiences. For those interested primarily in the collective public views on various topics, the narrative in chapters 2-6 will appeal. Scholars of public opinion or political behavior will be more interested in the theory and methodology portions, as well as the abundant empirical analysis. Despite the book's subtle, and not so subtle, embedded liberal biases, it is a valuable and timely study, a significant contribution to the literature, and a useful source for many audiences. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and graduate students. J. P. Dunn Converse College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> Benjamin I. Page is the Gordon Scott Fulcher Professor of Decision Making in the Department of Political Science at Northwestern University. He is the author or coauthor of, among other books, The Rational Public , Who Deliberates? and What Government Can Do .</p> <p> Marshall M. Bouton has been president of the Chicago Council on Foreign Relations since 2001. He is the author of Agrarian Radicalism in South India and Korea at the Crossroads .</p>

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