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When the Press Fails : Political Power and the News Media from Iraq to Katrina

By: Bennett, W. Lance.
Contributor(s): Lawrence, Regina G | Livingston, Steven.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Studies in Communication, Media, and Public Opinion: Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (279 p.).ISBN: 9780226042862.Subject(s): Government and the press -- United States -- History -- 21st century | Journalism -- Objectivity -- United States -- History -- 21st century | Press and politics -- United States -- History -- 21st centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: When the Press Fails : Political Power and the News Media from Iraq to KatrinaDDC classification: 071 LOC classification: PN4738Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
CONTENTS -- Preface -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction: The Press and Power -- 1. Press Politics in America: The Case of the Iraq War -- 2. The Semi-Independant Press: A Theory News and Democracy -- 3. None Dare Call it Torture: Abu Ghraib and the Inner Workings of Press Dependance -- 4. The News Reality Filter: Why It Matters When the Press Fails -- 5. Managing the News: Spin, Status, and Intimidation in the Washington Political Culture -- 6. Toward an Independant Press: A Standard for Public Accountability
Appendix A: Evidence Suggesting a Connectionbetween Abu Ghraib and U.S. Torture Policy -- Appendix B: Methods for Analyzing the News Framing of Abu Ghraib -- Appendix C: Further Findings from the Content Analysis -- Appendix D: Interview Protocol -- Notes -- References -- Index
Summary: A sobering look at the intimate relationship between political power and the news media, When the Press Fails argues the dependence of reporters on official sources disastrously thwarts coverage of dissenting voices from outside the Beltway.   The result is both an indictment of official spin and an urgent call to action that questions why the mainstream press failed to challenge the Bush administration's arguments for an invasion of Iraq or to illuminate administration policies underlying the Abu Ghraib controversy. Drawing on revealing interviews with Washington insiders and analysis of cont
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PN4738 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=408628 Available EBL408628

CONTENTS -- Preface -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction: The Press and Power -- 1. Press Politics in America: The Case of the Iraq War -- 2. The Semi-Independant Press: A Theory News and Democracy -- 3. None Dare Call it Torture: Abu Ghraib and the Inner Workings of Press Dependance -- 4. The News Reality Filter: Why It Matters When the Press Fails -- 5. Managing the News: Spin, Status, and Intimidation in the Washington Political Culture -- 6. Toward an Independant Press: A Standard for Public Accountability

Appendix A: Evidence Suggesting a Connectionbetween Abu Ghraib and U.S. Torture Policy -- Appendix B: Methods for Analyzing the News Framing of Abu Ghraib -- Appendix C: Further Findings from the Content Analysis -- Appendix D: Interview Protocol -- Notes -- References -- Index

A sobering look at the intimate relationship between political power and the news media, When the Press Fails argues the dependence of reporters on official sources disastrously thwarts coverage of dissenting voices from outside the Beltway.   The result is both an indictment of official spin and an urgent call to action that questions why the mainstream press failed to challenge the Bush administration's arguments for an invasion of Iraq or to illuminate administration policies underlying the Abu Ghraib controversy. Drawing on revealing interviews with Washington insiders and analysis of cont

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Presidential news coverage has always been a struggle for advantage between the White House and the press. Sometimes, due to a variety of factors, the White House gets the upper hand in the relationship. Bennett (communication and political science, Univ. of Washington), Lawrence (political science, Portland State Univ.), and Livingston (media and public affairs, George Washington Univ.) offer a thorough examination of how the White House has taken control of the press during critical events of the George W. Bush presidency. They present a disturbing picture of how reporters sometimes lose their critical edge and fall victims to the tactics of the White House media handlers. Their analysis offers a strong rebuke to the contemporary media and advances the necessity of a more independent-minded press. Those who have served inside presidential administrations tend to see the media as overly intrusive and negative, and often this perception is on target. In making the case that the media do not always have the upper hand in the often-contentious relationship between policy makers and reporters, this book serves political scientists as well as those interested in communication and media. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty and professionals; general readers. M. J. Rozell George Mason University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

W. Lance Bennett is professor of political science and the Ruddick C. Lawrence Professor of Communication at the University of Washington. Regina G. Lawrence is the Kevin P. Reilly Sr. Chair of Political Communication in the Manship School of Mass Communication at Louisiana State University. Steven Livingston is professor of media and international affairs in the School of Media and Public Affairs and the Elliott School of International Affairs at George Washington University.

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