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In Time of War : Understanding American Public Opinion from World War II to Iraq

By: Berinsky, Adam J.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Chicago Studies in American Politics: Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (355 p.).ISBN: 9780226043463.Subject(s): Iraq War, 2003-2011 -- Public opinion | Korean War, 1950-1953 -- United States -- Public opinion | Vietnam War, 1961-1975 -- United States -- Public opinion | War and society -- United States | World War, 1939-1945 -- United States -- Public opinionGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: In Time of War : Understanding American Public Opinion from World War II to IraqDDC classification: 303.660973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
CONTENTS -- List of Figures -- List of Tables -- Acknowledgments -- 1 Introduction: America at War -- PART I. Historical Perspective -- 2 Public Opinion and War: A Historical Perspective -- 3 The Myths and Meaning of Public Opinion and World War II -- PART II. The Structure of Support for War -- 4 The Calculation of Costs: An Innocent Public -- 5 Partisan Structure of War Support: Events, Elites, and the Public -- 6 Ethnic Groups: Attachments, Enmities, and Support for War -- PART III. Public Opinion and War: Back to the Water's Edge -- 7 Civil Liberties and War -- 8 Elections during Wartime
9 Conclusions -- APPENDIX A: Description of Data and Weighting -- APPENDIX B: Iraq War Casualty Survey Analysis -- APPENDIX C: Congressional Record Content Analysis -- APPENDIX D: Statistical Signifi cance of Ethnic Variables -- APPENDIX E: Relationship between Support for War and Supportfor Restricting Civil Liberties -- APPENDIX F: NES Analysis of Retrospective War Support -- Notes -- References -- Index
Summary: From World War II to the war in Iraq, periods of international conflict seem like unique moments in U.S. political history-but when it comes to public opinion, they are not. To make this groundbreaking revelation, In Time of War explodes conventional wisdom about American reactions to World War II, as well as the more recent conflicts in Korea, Vietnam, the Gulf, Afghanistan, and Iraq. Adam Berinsky argues that public response to these crises has been shaped less by their defining characteristics-such as what they cost in lives and resources-than by the same political interests and group affil
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CONTENTS -- List of Figures -- List of Tables -- Acknowledgments -- 1 Introduction: America at War -- PART I. Historical Perspective -- 2 Public Opinion and War: A Historical Perspective -- 3 The Myths and Meaning of Public Opinion and World War II -- PART II. The Structure of Support for War -- 4 The Calculation of Costs: An Innocent Public -- 5 Partisan Structure of War Support: Events, Elites, and the Public -- 6 Ethnic Groups: Attachments, Enmities, and Support for War -- PART III. Public Opinion and War: Back to the Water's Edge -- 7 Civil Liberties and War -- 8 Elections during Wartime

9 Conclusions -- APPENDIX A: Description of Data and Weighting -- APPENDIX B: Iraq War Casualty Survey Analysis -- APPENDIX C: Congressional Record Content Analysis -- APPENDIX D: Statistical Signifi cance of Ethnic Variables -- APPENDIX E: Relationship between Support for War and Supportfor Restricting Civil Liberties -- APPENDIX F: NES Analysis of Retrospective War Support -- Notes -- References -- Index

From World War II to the war in Iraq, periods of international conflict seem like unique moments in U.S. political history-but when it comes to public opinion, they are not. To make this groundbreaking revelation, In Time of War explodes conventional wisdom about American reactions to World War II, as well as the more recent conflicts in Korea, Vietnam, the Gulf, Afghanistan, and Iraq. Adam Berinsky argues that public response to these crises has been shaped less by their defining characteristics-such as what they cost in lives and resources-than by the same political interests and group affil

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Berinsky's interesting book is highly recommended for all students of US public opinion and US foreign policy. One distinctive aspect of the book is that it uses WW II opinion data. Most opinion scholars avoid this because the methods of those polls were less reliable than those currently used. Berinsky (MIT) uses weighting to attempt to compensate for the biased quota sampling of WW II polls. This and more reliable data from other wars (especially Korea and Vietnam) highlight several provocative conclusions. One main point is that domestic politics and domestic opinion are integral parts of opinion on foreign affairs. For example, membership in and attitudes toward ethnic groups cause divisions in opinion, even during WW II, which people tend to see as a conflict with great consensus. Crucially for the present, partisan divisions and elite cues greatly shape foreign policy opinion. For example, Berinsky argues that the public responds less to objective facts (e.g., war casualties) and more to the ways political leaders characterize conflicts. On the Iraq War, partisan divisions are unusually large. He sees sharp partisan divisions as causing the great partisan divide on the war, rather than vice versa. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All readership levels. J. Heyrman Berea College

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