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Citizen Speak : The Democratic Imagination in American Life

By: Perrin, Andrew J.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Morality and Society Series: Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (227 p.).ISBN: 9780226660783.Subject(s): Citizenship -- United States | Political culture -- United States | Political participation -- United States | Public opinion -- United States | United States -- Politics and government -- 21st century -- Public opinionGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Citizen Speak : The Democratic Imagination in American LifeDDC classification: 323.65 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents -- Acknowledgments -- Citizenship, Creativity, and the Democratic Imagination -- How Do Civic Organizations Mobilize? -- Talking about Politics in Groups: What to Look for in Citizenship Discourse -- Mistrust, Information, and Legitimation: Justifying Citizenship Decisions -- Morality, Ideology, and Interest -- Capacity and Expression: The Tactical Repertoire of Citizenship -- Political Microcultures: The Structure of Political Talk -- How to Use Civic Life to Build Citizenship -- Methodology: How Associations Mobilize -- Methodology: Focus Group Research -- References -- Index
Summary: When we think about what constitutes being a good citizen, routine activities like voting, letter writing, and paying attention to the news spring to mind. But in Citizen Speak, Andrew J. Perrin argues that these activities are only a small part of democratic citizenship-a standard of citizenship that requires creative thinking, talking, and acting. For Citizen Speak, Perrin met with labor, church, business, and sports organizations and proposed to them four fictive scenarios: what if your senator is involved in a scandal, or your police department is engaged in racial profiling, or a local fa
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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JK1759 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=471900 Available EBL471900

Contents -- Acknowledgments -- Citizenship, Creativity, and the Democratic Imagination -- How Do Civic Organizations Mobilize? -- Talking about Politics in Groups: What to Look for in Citizenship Discourse -- Mistrust, Information, and Legitimation: Justifying Citizenship Decisions -- Morality, Ideology, and Interest -- Capacity and Expression: The Tactical Repertoire of Citizenship -- Political Microcultures: The Structure of Political Talk -- How to Use Civic Life to Build Citizenship -- Methodology: How Associations Mobilize -- Methodology: Focus Group Research -- References -- Index

When we think about what constitutes being a good citizen, routine activities like voting, letter writing, and paying attention to the news spring to mind. But in Citizen Speak, Andrew J. Perrin argues that these activities are only a small part of democratic citizenship-a standard of citizenship that requires creative thinking, talking, and acting. For Citizen Speak, Perrin met with labor, church, business, and sports organizations and proposed to them four fictive scenarios: what if your senator is involved in a scandal, or your police department is engaged in racial profiling, or a local fa

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Perrin (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill) conducted 20 focus group studies in Alameda County, California, a place highly overrepresented by wealthy, educated Democrats. The author presented the non-randomly recruited participants from church, business, labor, and sports organizations with four fictional but realistic scenarios: senatorial scandal, police racial profiling, factory pollution, and airport expansion. Perrin claims that this is a better way to study democracy, because democracy starts with talking imaginatively. But there is a long road from talking in small laboratory settings to good democratic politics (e.g., the ability to elect a good president and prevent him from making disastrous mistakes). Moreover, since the imaginative talking that Perrin defines on page 49 is never exactly used later as a measurement, the book leaves the impression that people under different conditions are all able to talk imaginatively, even though they have imagined somewhat differently. Yet, this is still a good book, containing many interesting ideas and discussions, and with a creative research design and coding scheme. The book looks like a halfway project. Once more variations (e.g., other types of Americans) are introduced and the sociological conditions that foster constructive discussions are clarified, it will be wonderful. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students/faculty. D. Zhao University of Chicago

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Andrew J. Perrin is assistant professor of sociology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is coauthor of Women of Courage: Jewish and Italian Immigrant Women .<br>

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