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A Community Built on Words : The Constitution in History and Politics

By: Powell, H. Jefferson.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (263 p.).ISBN: 9780226677224.Subject(s): Constitutional history -- United States | Constitutional law -- United States | Electronic books. -- local | United States -- Politics and governmentGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: A Community Built on Words : The Constitution in History and PoliticsDDC classification: 342.73 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents -- Preface -- Introduction -- Part One -- I. 1790: Secretary Jefferson and the Foreign Affairs Power -- II. 1791: The National Bank and the Point of Interpretation -- III. 1793: The Supreme Court and the Metaphysics of Sovereignty -- IV. 1794: Kamper v. Hawkins and the Role of the Judiciary -- V. 1798 (1): Justice Paterson and the Missing Fundamental Principle -- Part Two -- VI. 1798 (2): How to Think about the Sedition Act -- VII. 1800: Marshall and the Role of the Political Branches -- VIII. 1802: How Not to Think about the Judiciary Repeal Act
IX. 1804: Turpin v. Locket and the Place of Religion -- X. 1806: Hudgins v. Wright and the Place of Slavery -- XI. 1808-1809: A Forgotten Crossroads in Constitutional History -- Part Three -- XII. 1817: President Madison Vetoes His Own Bill -- XIII. 1818: The Congress Thinks about Internal Improvements -- XIV. 1821: The Attorney General and the Rule of Law -- XV. 1829: Writing State v. Mann -- Part Four -- XVI. 1859: The Supreme Court and the Metaphysics of Supremacy -- XVII. 1862: Four Attorneys General and the Meaning of Citizenship -- XVIII. 1873: Slaughterhouse Revisited
XIX. 1904: Clay May, the Railroad, and Justice Holmes -- XX. 1927: Justice Brandeis and the Final End of the State -- XXI. 1944: Constitutional Injustice -- Part Five -- XXII. 2002: Common Ground after Two Centuries -- Conclusion -- Notes -- Index
Summary: H. Jefferson Powell offers a powerful new approach to one of the central issues in American constitutional thinking today: the problem of constitutional law's historicity, or the many ways in which constitutional arguments and outcomes are shaped both by historical circumstances and by the political goals and commitments of various actors, including judges. The presence of such influences is often considered highly problematic: if constitutional law is political and historical through and through, then what differentiates it from politics per se, and what gives it integrity and coherence? Powe
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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KF4550 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=496635 Available EBL496635

Contents -- Preface -- Introduction -- Part One -- I. 1790: Secretary Jefferson and the Foreign Affairs Power -- II. 1791: The National Bank and the Point of Interpretation -- III. 1793: The Supreme Court and the Metaphysics of Sovereignty -- IV. 1794: Kamper v. Hawkins and the Role of the Judiciary -- V. 1798 (1): Justice Paterson and the Missing Fundamental Principle -- Part Two -- VI. 1798 (2): How to Think about the Sedition Act -- VII. 1800: Marshall and the Role of the Political Branches -- VIII. 1802: How Not to Think about the Judiciary Repeal Act

IX. 1804: Turpin v. Locket and the Place of Religion -- X. 1806: Hudgins v. Wright and the Place of Slavery -- XI. 1808-1809: A Forgotten Crossroads in Constitutional History -- Part Three -- XII. 1817: President Madison Vetoes His Own Bill -- XIII. 1818: The Congress Thinks about Internal Improvements -- XIV. 1821: The Attorney General and the Rule of Law -- XV. 1829: Writing State v. Mann -- Part Four -- XVI. 1859: The Supreme Court and the Metaphysics of Supremacy -- XVII. 1862: Four Attorneys General and the Meaning of Citizenship -- XVIII. 1873: Slaughterhouse Revisited

XIX. 1904: Clay May, the Railroad, and Justice Holmes -- XX. 1927: Justice Brandeis and the Final End of the State -- XXI. 1944: Constitutional Injustice -- Part Five -- XXII. 2002: Common Ground after Two Centuries -- Conclusion -- Notes -- Index

H. Jefferson Powell offers a powerful new approach to one of the central issues in American constitutional thinking today: the problem of constitutional law's historicity, or the many ways in which constitutional arguments and outcomes are shaped both by historical circumstances and by the political goals and commitments of various actors, including judges. The presence of such influences is often considered highly problematic: if constitutional law is political and historical through and through, then what differentiates it from politics per se, and what gives it integrity and coherence? Powe

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

H. Jefferson Powell is a professor of law at Duke University. He is the author of several books, including The President's Authority over Foreign Affairs . He served as deputy assistant attorney general in the Clinton administration.

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