Normal view MARC view ISBD view

What Is Happening to News : The Information Explosion and the Crisis in Journalism

By: Fuller, Jack.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (230 p.).ISBN: 9780226268996.Subject(s): Affective neuroscience | Electronic books. -- local | Information society | Journalism -- United States | Journalistic ethics | News audiencesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: What Is Happening to News : The Information Explosion and the Crisis in JournalismDDC classification: 071 LOC classification: PN4867Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents -- Preface -- Chapter One: The Collapse of the Old Order -- Chapter Two: The Science of Journalism -- Chapter Three: Models of the Mind -- Chapter Four: Knees, Natural Selection, and Neuron Networks -- Chapter Five: Knowing What You Feel -- Chapter Six: The Two Searchlights -- Chapter Seven: Tricked by Our Minds -- Chapter Eight: The Acids of Postmodernity -- Chapter Nine: Tulips and the Hive -- Chapter Ten: The Secrets of Story -- Chapter Eleven: A Kind of Truth -- Chapter Twelve: A Matter of Respect -- Chapter Thirteen: A New Rhetoric for News -- Afterword -- Notes
Suggested Reading -- Bibliography -- Index
Summary: Across America, newspapers that have defined their cities for over a century are rapidly failing, their circulations plummeting even as opinion-soaked web outlets like the Huffington Post thrive. Meanwhile, nightly news programs shock viewers with stories of horrific crime and celebrity scandal, while the smug sarcasm and shouting of pundits like Glenn Beck and Keith Olbermann dominate cable television. Is it any wonder that young people are turning away from the news entirely, trusting comedians like Jon Stewart as their primary source of information on current events? In the face of all the
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PN4867 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=534579 Available EBL534579

Contents -- Preface -- Chapter One: The Collapse of the Old Order -- Chapter Two: The Science of Journalism -- Chapter Three: Models of the Mind -- Chapter Four: Knees, Natural Selection, and Neuron Networks -- Chapter Five: Knowing What You Feel -- Chapter Six: The Two Searchlights -- Chapter Seven: Tricked by Our Minds -- Chapter Eight: The Acids of Postmodernity -- Chapter Nine: Tulips and the Hive -- Chapter Ten: The Secrets of Story -- Chapter Eleven: A Kind of Truth -- Chapter Twelve: A Matter of Respect -- Chapter Thirteen: A New Rhetoric for News -- Afterword -- Notes

Suggested Reading -- Bibliography -- Index

Across America, newspapers that have defined their cities for over a century are rapidly failing, their circulations plummeting even as opinion-soaked web outlets like the Huffington Post thrive. Meanwhile, nightly news programs shock viewers with stories of horrific crime and celebrity scandal, while the smug sarcasm and shouting of pundits like Glenn Beck and Keith Olbermann dominate cable television. Is it any wonder that young people are turning away from the news entirely, trusting comedians like Jon Stewart as their primary source of information on current events? In the face of all the

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

The crisis in journalism is a hot topic for media scholars, and new books analyzing the situation are appearing monthly. Many cover familiar ground-the growth of the Internet, loss of advertising revenue, increasing corporate ownership, and changed reading behavior. Fuller, a Pulitzer Prize winner and former editor and publisher of the Chicago Tribune, takes a different tack and explores how recent discoveries in neuroscience explain why traditional professional journalism no longer meets the needs of contemporary audiences. He argues that in an information-rich environment, the human brain will be attracted to "emotionally significant stimuli," or to sensational news rather than objective coverage. He recommends a complete rethinking of the objectivity standards and the development of a new rhetoric for news. Verdict Fuller's advocacy of both a redefinition of news and a more emotionally rich approach to its coverage will be controversial for many. Journalists and communication scholars trying to understand what is happening to news will want to read this book.-Judy Solberg, Seattle Univ. Lib. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Alas, one assumes: another elegy for newspapers. Not so. In fact, Fuller offers a thoughtful, wide-ranging meditation on the medium's losing campaign for the eyeball. This intellectually ambitious book draws heavily on the work of Pulitzer Prize-winner Walter Lippmann in tandem with philosopher Maurice Merleau-Ponty. Fuller himself bleeds ink (son of a newspaperman, he was editor and publisher of Chicago Tribune before it fell prey to corporate interests), and he uses his newsroom experience well. But what makes this book different from many others of its kind are Fuller's deft carom shots off such thinkers as cognitive linguist Steven Pinker and researchers interested in how the brain processes media input. Fuller uses these resources to analyze, among many other things, the interplay of emotion and understanding as the mind reads a newspaper. This worthy addition to the journalism bookshelf will stand the test of time. Summing Up: Essential. All readers. C. A. Riley II Baruch College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Jack William Fuller was born in Chicago, Illinois on October 12, 1946. At the age of 16, he joined the The Chicago Tribune as a copy boy. He received a bachelor's degree in journalism from the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University in 1968. After serving in the Army as a Vietnam correspondent for the newspaper Pacific Stars and Stripes, he received a law degree from Yale University Law School in 1973. <p> He was hired as a general assignment reporter by The Tribune in 1973, but left in 1975 to become a special assistant to the United States attorney general, Edward H. Levi. He rejoined the newspaper in 1977 as a Washington correspondent. He was editorial page editor from 1981 to 1987. He won the Pulitzer Prize for editorial writing in 1986 for his commentary on constitutional and legal issues. He was named executive editor in 1987, vice president and editor in 1989, publisher in 1994, and executive vice president of the parent Tribune Publishing Co. in 1997. He retired from The Tribune in 2004 as its president. <p> His first novel, Convergence, was published in 1982. His other novels include Fragments, The Best of Jackson Payne, and One from Without. His nonfiction books include News Values: Ideas for an Information Age and What Is Happening to News: The Information Explosion and the Crisis in Journalism. He died from lung cancer on June 21, 2016 at the age of 69. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.