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Living Liberalism : Practical Citizenship in Mid-Victorian Britain

By: Hadley, Elaine.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (401 p.).ISBN: 9780226311906.Subject(s): Electronic books. -- local | Great Britain -- Politics and government -- 1837-1901 | Liberalism -- Great Britain -- History -- 19th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Living Liberalism : Practical Citizenship in Mid-Victorian BritainDDC classification: 320.51 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
CONTENTS -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction: Politics as Unusual -- 1. Liberal Formalism in an Informal World -- 2. A Body of Thought: The Form of Liberal Individualism -- 3. A Frame of Mind: Signature Liberalism at the Fortnightly Review -- 4. Thinking Inside the Box: The Ballot and the Politics of Liberal Citizenship -- 5. Occupational Hazards: The Irishness of Liberal Opinion -- 6. A Body of Opinion: Gladstonian Liberalism -- Bibliography -- Index
Summary: In the mid-Victorian era, liberalism was a practical politics: it had a party, it informed legislation, and it had adherents who identified with and expressed it as opinion. It was also the first British political movement to depend more on people than property, and on opinion rather than interest. But how would these subjects of liberal politics actually live liberalism? To answer this question, Elaine Hadley focuses on the key concept of individuation-how it is embodied in politics and daily life and how it is expressed through opinion, discussion and sincerity.  These are concerns that have
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CONTENTS -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction: Politics as Unusual -- 1. Liberal Formalism in an Informal World -- 2. A Body of Thought: The Form of Liberal Individualism -- 3. A Frame of Mind: Signature Liberalism at the Fortnightly Review -- 4. Thinking Inside the Box: The Ballot and the Politics of Liberal Citizenship -- 5. Occupational Hazards: The Irishness of Liberal Opinion -- 6. A Body of Opinion: Gladstonian Liberalism -- Bibliography -- Index

In the mid-Victorian era, liberalism was a practical politics: it had a party, it informed legislation, and it had adherents who identified with and expressed it as opinion. It was also the first British political movement to depend more on people than property, and on opinion rather than interest. But how would these subjects of liberal politics actually live liberalism? To answer this question, Elaine Hadley focuses on the key concept of individuation-how it is embodied in politics and daily life and how it is expressed through opinion, discussion and sincerity.  These are concerns that have

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In this revisionist history, Hadley (English, Univ. of Chicago) looks at the meaning of "living liberalism" during the period from 1859 to the early 1880s. She hopes that by reframing the concept of "mid-Victorian," she can "isolate a period of political liberalism" distinct from both the earlier and later periods of 19th-century liberalism. Rejecting Jurgen Habermas's ideas in favor of Lauren Berlant's "theorization of citizenship" and of various other feminist political stances, Hadley focuses on how liberalism's theories were realized in practice through the public sphere, the ballot box, and the formation of legislation. Using literary analysis in some chapters and the ideas of opinion politics in others, the author attempts a close reading of Victorian novels and other writings to develop a clear understanding of what people thought and lived. But throughout she retains the language of critical theory rather than historicism. Though she proves her research skills with a 16-page bibliography referencing recent modern scholarship and contemporary authors, Hadley tends to insert herself too often into the work ("my book," "my theory"), sometimes ignoring the historical context in order to make her point. Summing Up: Optional. Graduate students, researchers. K. Lynass University of North Texas

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Elaine Hadley is associate professor of English at the University of Chicago.

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