Suffering Made Real : American Science and the Survivors at Hiroshima

By: Lindee, M. SusanMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandPublisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (316 p.)ISBN: 9780226482361Subject(s): Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission | Atomic bomb victims -- Japan -- Hiroshima-shi | Children of atomic bomb victims -- Japan -- Hiroshima-shi | Electronic books. -- local | Hiroshima-shi (Japan) -- History -- Bombardment, 1945 | Radiation -- Physiological effect -- Research -- Social aspectsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Suffering Made Real : American Science and the Survivors at HiroshimaDDC classification: 363.17 LOC classification: RA1231Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents -- Acknowledgments -- ONE How the ABCC Began -- 1 The Most Important People Living -- 2 Colonial Science -- 3 Into the Field -- 4 The Genetics Study -- TWO Managing the ABCC -- 5 Midwives and Mothers -- 6 Political Survival in Washington -- 7 The No-Treatment Policy -- 8 The Public Meaning of the ABCC -- THREE Science and Context -- 9 What is a Mutation? -- 10 Draft Analysis, 1952-1953 -- 11 Publication Strategies -- 12 The ABCC and the RERF -- 13 Conclusions -- Bibliography -- Index -- A gallery of photographs follows
Summary: The atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August of 1945 unleashed a force as mysterious as it was deadly-radioactivity. In 1946, the United States government created the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) to serve as a permanent agency in Japan with the official mission of studying the medical effects of radiation on the survivors. The next ten years saw the ABCC's most intensive research on the genetic effects of radiation, and up until 1974 the ABCC scientists published papers on the effects of radiation on aging, life span, fertility, and disease. Suffering Made Real is the
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Contents -- Acknowledgments -- ONE How the ABCC Began -- 1 The Most Important People Living -- 2 Colonial Science -- 3 Into the Field -- 4 The Genetics Study -- TWO Managing the ABCC -- 5 Midwives and Mothers -- 6 Political Survival in Washington -- 7 The No-Treatment Policy -- 8 The Public Meaning of the ABCC -- THREE Science and Context -- 9 What is a Mutation? -- 10 Draft Analysis, 1952-1953 -- 11 Publication Strategies -- 12 The ABCC and the RERF -- 13 Conclusions -- Bibliography -- Index -- A gallery of photographs follows

The atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August of 1945 unleashed a force as mysterious as it was deadly-radioactivity. In 1946, the United States government created the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) to serve as a permanent agency in Japan with the official mission of studying the medical effects of radiation on the survivors. The next ten years saw the ABCC's most intensive research on the genetic effects of radiation, and up until 1974 the ABCC scientists published papers on the effects of radiation on aging, life span, fertility, and disease. Suffering Made Real is the

Description based upon print version of record.

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CHOICE Review

Lindee tells the story of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC), established in 1946, to study the genetic and biological effects of radiation on Hiroshima and Nagasaki survivors. In great detail, she demonstrates that scientific research and its results are filtered by cultural norms and political interests. She does much to show that an objective science, immune to the shifting sands of social influences and nationalistic considerations, did not operate among the scientists who sought to explore the aftereffects of the atomic bombs on Japanese who had been exposed to them, but who had not succumbed. The cultural framework of examiners shaped their selection of questions; the research and resulting data were a product of those socially constructed choices. In assessing the radiation damage of the atomic bombs, American scientists' work reflected interpretations of the US decision to use the bombs and the prevailing realities of Cold War politics. One especially fascinating chapter describes why the ABCC did not treat survivors whose health, as ABCC physicians discovered, was harmed by atomic radiation. This sophisticated study will be appreciated by specialists in the history of science and medicine. Upper-division undergraduate through professional. J. P. Brickman; United States Merchant Marine Academy

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