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Starring Mandela and Cosby : Media and the End(s) of Apartheid

By: Krabill, Ron.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (215 p.).ISBN: 9780226451909.Subject(s): Apartheid -- South Africa | Cosby show (Television program : 1984-1992) -- Influence | Mass media and race relations -- South Africa -- History -- 20th century | Television and politics -- South Africa -- History -- 20th century | Television broadcasting -- Social aspects -- South Africa -- History -- 20th century | Television viewers -- South Africa -- Attitudes -- History -- 20th century | Whites -- South Africa -- Attitudes -- History -- 20th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Starring Mandela and Cosby : Media and the End(s) of ApartheidDDC classification: 302.2345 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents -- Acknowledgments -- List of Abbreviations -- Introduction: Media, Democratization, and the End(s) of Apartheid -- 1. Structured Absences and Communicative Spaces -- 2. In the Absence of Television -- 3. "They Stayed 'til the Flag Streamed" -- 4. Surfing into Zulu -- 5. Living with the Huxtables in a State of Emergency -- 6. I May Not Be a Freedom Fighter, but I Play One on TV -- Conclusion: Television and the Afterlife of Apartheid -- Postscript -- Notes -- Index
Summary: During the worst years of apartheid, the most popular show on television in South Africa-among both Black and White South Africans-was The Cosby Show. Why did people living under a system built on the idea that Black people were inferior and threatening flock to a show that portrayed African Americans as comfortably mainstream? Starring Mandela and Cosby takes up this paradox, revealing the surprising impact of television on racial politics. The South African government maintained a ban on television until 1976, and according to Ron Krabill, they were right to be wary of its potential power. T
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PN1992 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=584941 Available EBL584941

Contents -- Acknowledgments -- List of Abbreviations -- Introduction: Media, Democratization, and the End(s) of Apartheid -- 1. Structured Absences and Communicative Spaces -- 2. In the Absence of Television -- 3. "They Stayed 'til the Flag Streamed" -- 4. Surfing into Zulu -- 5. Living with the Huxtables in a State of Emergency -- 6. I May Not Be a Freedom Fighter, but I Play One on TV -- Conclusion: Television and the Afterlife of Apartheid -- Postscript -- Notes -- Index

During the worst years of apartheid, the most popular show on television in South Africa-among both Black and White South Africans-was The Cosby Show. Why did people living under a system built on the idea that Black people were inferior and threatening flock to a show that portrayed African Americans as comfortably mainstream? Starring Mandela and Cosby takes up this paradox, revealing the surprising impact of television on racial politics. The South African government maintained a ban on television until 1976, and according to Ron Krabill, they were right to be wary of its potential power. T

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> Ron Krabill is associate professor in the Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences Program at the University of Washington Bothell and a member of the graduate faculty in the Department of Communication at the University of Washington Seattle.</p>

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