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No Time To Think : The Menace of Media Speed and the 24-hour News Cycle

By: Rosenberg, Howard.
Contributor(s): Feldman, Charles S.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: New York : Bloomsbury Publishing, 2014Description: 1 online resource (239 p.).ISBN: 9781441141408.Subject(s): Journalism -- Objectivity -- United States | Journalism -- Social aspects -- United States | Journalism -- United States | Television broadcasting of news -- United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: No Time To Think : The Menace of Media Speed and the 24-hour News CycleDDC classification: 071 LOC classification: PN4867.2 .R67 2009Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents -- Prologue -- Acknowledgments -- Chapter 1 "Why Is Speed So Bad?" -- Chapter 2 Two Revolutions: French and Mexican -- Chapter 3 All the News before It Happens -- Chapter 4 Blog On! -- Chapter 5 A New Protestant Reformation: Citizen Journalists to the Rescue -- Chapter 6 "In-Depth Instant Results" -- Chapter 7 Desperate Newspapers Play Catch-Up -- Chapter 8 Mr. Inside and Mr. Outside: A Conversation -- Chapter 9 What If ? Scenarios, Dark and Darker -- Chapter 10 Five Grams News, Ten Grams Speculation -- Afterword -- Bibliography -- Index -- A -- B -- C -- D -- E -- F -- G -- H -- I
J -- K -- L -- M -- N -- O -- P -- R -- S -- T -- U -- V -- W -- X -- Y -- Z
Summary: An eviscerating look at the state of journalism in the age of the 24 hour news cycle by a Pulitzer Prize-winning television critic and a veteran news correspondent. No Time To Think focuses on the insidious and increasing portion of the news media that, due to the dangerously extreme speed at which it is produced, is only half thought out, half true, and lazily repeated from anonymous sources interested in selling opinion and wild speculation as news.  These news item can easily gain exposure today, assuming a life of their own while making a mockery of journalism and creating casualties of co
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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PN4867.2 .R67 2009 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=601536 Available EBL601536

Contents -- Prologue -- Acknowledgments -- Chapter 1 "Why Is Speed So Bad?" -- Chapter 2 Two Revolutions: French and Mexican -- Chapter 3 All the News before It Happens -- Chapter 4 Blog On! -- Chapter 5 A New Protestant Reformation: Citizen Journalists to the Rescue -- Chapter 6 "In-Depth Instant Results" -- Chapter 7 Desperate Newspapers Play Catch-Up -- Chapter 8 Mr. Inside and Mr. Outside: A Conversation -- Chapter 9 What If ? Scenarios, Dark and Darker -- Chapter 10 Five Grams News, Ten Grams Speculation -- Afterword -- Bibliography -- Index -- A -- B -- C -- D -- E -- F -- G -- H -- I

J -- K -- L -- M -- N -- O -- P -- R -- S -- T -- U -- V -- W -- X -- Y -- Z

An eviscerating look at the state of journalism in the age of the 24 hour news cycle by a Pulitzer Prize-winning television critic and a veteran news correspondent. No Time To Think focuses on the insidious and increasing portion of the news media that, due to the dangerously extreme speed at which it is produced, is only half thought out, half true, and lazily repeated from anonymous sources interested in selling opinion and wild speculation as news.  These news item can easily gain exposure today, assuming a life of their own while making a mockery of journalism and creating casualties of co

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Veteran journalists Rosenberg and Feldman examine the shrinking news cycle--the period of time between when a news event occurs and its reportage--through a series of incisive essays. They decry the reckless speed at which stories appear in print, electronic, and broadcast media, which sacrifices journalistic integrity and fact-checking processes. They trace this need for speed back to the advent of 24/7 cable news networks like CNN, which was founded in 1980. Under pressure to fill hours of airtime, networks began inflating stories by constantly updating them, magnifying non-news events, and injecting personal conjecture from anchors. The Internet, blogs, and the birth of citizen journalism led to even higher stakes for the professionals. Rosenberg and Feldman suggest that while speed itself is not bad, the resultant erosion of professional standards affects public perception of what is newsworthy. Similar in tone to Rosenberg's earlier Not So Prime Time: Chasing the Trivial on American Television, this book pulls no punches in its assessment of the profession. Recommended for academic and public libraries.--Regina M. Beard, Kansas State Univ. Libs., Manhattan (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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