Thug Life : Race, Gender, and the Meaning of Hip-Hop

By: Jeffries, Michael PMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandPublisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (274 p.)ISBN: 9780226395869Subject(s): Electronic books. -- local | Hip-hop -- Social aspects -- United States | Rap (Music) -- Social aspects -- United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Thug Life : Race, Gender, and the Meaning of Hip-HopDDC classification: 305.896073 LOC classification: ML3918Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction: State of the Hip-Hop Union -- One/ The Meaning of Hip-Hop -- Two/ From a Cool Complex to Complex Cool -- Three/ Thug Life and Social Death -- The Bridge/ Summary of Chapters Two and Three -- Four/ Hip-Hop Authenticity in Black and White -- Five/ Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics -- Conclusion: The Last Verse -- Epilogue: Obama as Hip-Hop Icon -- Appendix: Qualitative Methodology -- Notes -- References -- Discography -- Index
Summary: Hip-hop has come a long way from its origins in the Bronx in the 1970s, when rapping and DJing were just part of a lively, decidedly local scene that also venerated b-boying and graffiti. Now hip-hop is a global phenomenon and, in the United States, a massively successful corporate enterprise predominantly controlled and consumed by whites while the most prominent performers are black. How does this shift in racial dynamics affect our understanding of contemporary hip-hop, especially when the music perpetuates stereotypes of black men? Do black listeners interpret hip-hop differently from whit
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Contents -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction: State of the Hip-Hop Union -- One/ The Meaning of Hip-Hop -- Two/ From a Cool Complex to Complex Cool -- Three/ Thug Life and Social Death -- The Bridge/ Summary of Chapters Two and Three -- Four/ Hip-Hop Authenticity in Black and White -- Five/ Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics -- Conclusion: The Last Verse -- Epilogue: Obama as Hip-Hop Icon -- Appendix: Qualitative Methodology -- Notes -- References -- Discography -- Index

Hip-hop has come a long way from its origins in the Bronx in the 1970s, when rapping and DJing were just part of a lively, decidedly local scene that also venerated b-boying and graffiti. Now hip-hop is a global phenomenon and, in the United States, a massively successful corporate enterprise predominantly controlled and consumed by whites while the most prominent performers are black. How does this shift in racial dynamics affect our understanding of contemporary hip-hop, especially when the music perpetuates stereotypes of black men? Do black listeners interpret hip-hop differently from whit

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Jeffries (American studies, Wellesley College) presents a lyrical sociological analysis of commercial rap music and hip-hop culture. Originally Jeffries's Harvard dissertation, the study asks two questions: Do black male rappers perpetuate negative stereotypes through their musical performance? Do black listeners and white listeners interpret rap music differently? The author interviewed 20 white males and 20 black males (unfortunately, no females) with diverse cultural and economic backgrounds from the greater Boston area. His analysis reveals the importance of rap music and hip-hop culture in male listeners' everyday lives. In particular, black male listeners use rap music and hip-hop culture as a coping tool. The author addresses the commodification of rap music and hip-hop culture by nonblack corporations, noting that popular music is a commodity owned and controlled by global media conglomerates, which are far removed from the listeners to their music commodities. Jeffries explains how young rap music listeners internalize and express their affinity with a highly commercial music genre and cultural movement. This is an important resource for understanding personal and sociological aspects of rap music. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. L. Hendricks The Ohio State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Michael P. Jeffries is assistant professor of American studies at Wellesley College.

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