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In Search of Goodness.

By: Grant, Ruth W.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (187 p.).ISBN: 9780226306858.Subject(s): Electronic books. -- local | Ethics | Good and evilGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: In Search of GoodnessDDC classification: 170 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents -- Preface -- Introduction -- 1. The Nature and Nurture of Morality -- 2. "Generous to a Fault": Moral Goodness and Psychic Health -- 3. Are Moral Conversions Possible? -- 4. What Good Is Innocence? -- 5. God and Goodness: A Theological Exploration -- 6. To Make This Emergence Articulate: The Beautiful, the Tragic Sublime, the Good, and the Shapes of Common Practice -- 7. The Tragedy of the Goods and the Pursuit of Happiness: The Question of the Good and the Goods -- 8. The Goodness of Searching: Good as What? Good for What? Good for Whom? -- Contributors -- Index of Names
Summary: The recent spate of books and articles reflecting on the question of evil might make one forget that the question of just what constitutes goodness is no less urgent or perplexing. Everyone wants to think of him- or herself as good. But what does a good life look like? And how do people become good? Are there multiple, competing possibilities for what counts as a good life, all equally worthy? Or, is there a unified and transcendent conception of the good that should guide our judgment of the possibilities? What does a good life look like when it is guided by God? How is a good life involved w
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Contents -- Preface -- Introduction -- 1. The Nature and Nurture of Morality -- 2. "Generous to a Fault": Moral Goodness and Psychic Health -- 3. Are Moral Conversions Possible? -- 4. What Good Is Innocence? -- 5. God and Goodness: A Theological Exploration -- 6. To Make This Emergence Articulate: The Beautiful, the Tragic Sublime, the Good, and the Shapes of Common Practice -- 7. The Tragedy of the Goods and the Pursuit of Happiness: The Question of the Good and the Goods -- 8. The Goodness of Searching: Good as What? Good for What? Good for Whom? -- Contributors -- Index of Names

The recent spate of books and articles reflecting on the question of evil might make one forget that the question of just what constitutes goodness is no less urgent or perplexing. Everyone wants to think of him- or herself as good. But what does a good life look like? And how do people become good? Are there multiple, competing possibilities for what counts as a good life, all equally worthy? Or, is there a unified and transcendent conception of the good that should guide our judgment of the possibilities? What does a good life look like when it is guided by God? How is a good life involved w

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This impressive collection complements an earlier book developed from an interdisciplinary conference on questions about the nature, types, and identification of evil. Goodness is an elusive and multifaceted concept, albeit central to much ethical and political thinking. Thus, Grant (Duke Univ.) structures the collection around two primary questions: How do people become good, and what does a good life look like? Consider how objective increases in quality of life exist alongside disconcertingly stagnant or decreasing levels of self-reported happiness. The book demonstrates that the good life is not a unitary ideal but a matter of how people perceive and make intelligible the significance of their experiences and human qualities. It is also often about how and why people fail to do so. Contributors incorporate illuminating examples from psychology (Milgram's obedience experiment), literature (Billy Budd), and film (The Lives of Others) to explain different elements of the good life and the peculiar challenges of modernity. The book is notable as an exemplar of interdisciplinary study, making it an excellent resource for accessing a topic whose nuances can quickly assume a vast and unwieldy quality. Summing Up: Recommended. General readers, upper-division undergraduate students, and graduate students. N. D. Zavediuk Saint Louis University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> Ruth W. Grant is professor of political science and philosophy and a senior fellow at the Kenan Institute for Ethics at Duke University. She is the editor of Naming Evil, Judging Evil , also published by the University of Chicago Press.</p>

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