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Reading the Shape of Nature : Comparative Zoology at the Agassiz Museum

By: Winsor, Mary P.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Science and Its Conceptual Foundations series: Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (345 p.).ISBN: 9780226902081.Subject(s): Agassiz, Alexander, -- 1835-1910 | Agassiz, Louis, -- 1807-1873 | Animals -- Classification -- History | Barbour, Thomas, -- 1884-1946 | Harvard University. -- Museum of Comparative Zoology -- History | Natural history -- Classification -- History | Naturalists -- United States -- BiographyGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Reading the Shape of Nature : Comparative Zoology at the Agassiz MuseumDDC classification: 570 LOC classification: QL71Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents -- Illustrations -- Preface -- Acknowledgments -- 1. ""In the Prime of His Admirable Manhood"" -- 2. ""I Have Been Disappointed in My Collaboration"" -- 3. ""Our Work Must Be Done with Much More Precision"" -- 4. ""An Object Worthy of a Life's Devotion"" -- 5. ""The Many Plans Started by My Father"" -- 6. ""Shall We Say 'Ignorabimus,' or Chase a Phantom?"" -- 7. ""The Slender Threas is Practically Severed"" -- 8. ""Results Unattainable by Museum Study Alone"" -- 9. ""Collections Never of Use to Anyone"" -- 10. ""Dependent on the Personal Feelings of the Authors""
11. ""I Made Up My Mind That Very Day to Be Director"" -- Concluding Remarks -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index
Summary: Reading the Shape of Nature vividly recounts the turbulent early history of the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard and the contrasting careers of its founder Louis Agassiz and his son Alexander. Through the story of this institution and the individuals who formed it, Mary P. Winsor explores the conflicting forces that shaped systematics in the second half of the nineteenth century. Debates over the philosophical foundations of classification, details of taxonomic research, the young institution's financial struggles, and the personalities of the men most deeply involved are all brought t
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
QL71 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=680717 Available EBL680717

Contents -- Illustrations -- Preface -- Acknowledgments -- 1. ""In the Prime of His Admirable Manhood"" -- 2. ""I Have Been Disappointed in My Collaboration"" -- 3. ""Our Work Must Be Done with Much More Precision"" -- 4. ""An Object Worthy of a Life's Devotion"" -- 5. ""The Many Plans Started by My Father"" -- 6. ""Shall We Say 'Ignorabimus,' or Chase a Phantom?"" -- 7. ""The Slender Threas is Practically Severed"" -- 8. ""Results Unattainable by Museum Study Alone"" -- 9. ""Collections Never of Use to Anyone"" -- 10. ""Dependent on the Personal Feelings of the Authors""

11. ""I Made Up My Mind That Very Day to Be Director"" -- Concluding Remarks -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index

Reading the Shape of Nature vividly recounts the turbulent early history of the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard and the contrasting careers of its founder Louis Agassiz and his son Alexander. Through the story of this institution and the individuals who formed it, Mary P. Winsor explores the conflicting forces that shaped systematics in the second half of the nineteenth century. Debates over the philosophical foundations of classification, details of taxonomic research, the young institution's financial struggles, and the personalities of the men most deeply involved are all brought t

Description based upon print version of record.

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