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Strings Attached : Untangling the Ethics of Incentives

By: Grant, Ruth W.
Contributor(s): Grant, Ruth W. W.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, 2012Description: 1 online resource (144 p.).ISBN: 9781400839742.Subject(s): Incentive (Psychology) | Motivation (Psychology) | Political ethics | Political psychologyGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Strings Attached : Untangling the Ethics of IncentivesDDC classification: 170 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Contents -- Preface -- Acknowledgments -- ONE: WHY WORRY ABOUT INCENTIVES? -- TWO: INCENTIVES THEN AND NOW: The Clock and the Engineer -- THREE: ""INCENTIVES TALK"": What are Incentives Anyway? -- FOUR: ETHICAL AND NOT SO ETHICAL INCENTIVES -- FIVE: APPLYING STANDARDS, MAKING JUDGMENTS -- SIX: GETTING DOWN TO CASES -- Plea Bargaining -- Recruiting Medical Research Subjects -- IMF Loan Conditions -- Motivating Children to Learn -- SEVEN: BEYOND VOLUNTARINESS -- EIGHT: A DIFFERENT KIND OF CONVERSATION -- Notes -- References -- Index -- A -- B -- C -- D -- E -- F -- G -- H -- I -- J
K -- L -- M -- N -- O -- P -- R -- S -- T -- U -- V -- W
Summary: Incentives can be found everywhere--in schools, businesses, factories, and government--influencing people's choices about almost everything, from financial decisions and tobacco use to exercise and child rearing. So long as people have a choice, incentives seem innocuous. But Strings Attached demonstrates that when incentives are viewed as a kind of power rather than as a form of exchange, many ethical questions arise: How do incentives affect character and institutional culture? Can incentives be manipulative or exploitative, even if people are free to refuse them? What are the responsibiliti
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
JA74.5 -- .G73 2011 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=767223 Available EBL767223

Cover -- Contents -- Preface -- Acknowledgments -- ONE: WHY WORRY ABOUT INCENTIVES? -- TWO: INCENTIVES THEN AND NOW: The Clock and the Engineer -- THREE: ""INCENTIVES TALK"": What are Incentives Anyway? -- FOUR: ETHICAL AND NOT SO ETHICAL INCENTIVES -- FIVE: APPLYING STANDARDS, MAKING JUDGMENTS -- SIX: GETTING DOWN TO CASES -- Plea Bargaining -- Recruiting Medical Research Subjects -- IMF Loan Conditions -- Motivating Children to Learn -- SEVEN: BEYOND VOLUNTARINESS -- EIGHT: A DIFFERENT KIND OF CONVERSATION -- Notes -- References -- Index -- A -- B -- C -- D -- E -- F -- G -- H -- I -- J

K -- L -- M -- N -- O -- P -- R -- S -- T -- U -- V -- W

Incentives can be found everywhere--in schools, businesses, factories, and government--influencing people's choices about almost everything, from financial decisions and tobacco use to exercise and child rearing. So long as people have a choice, incentives seem innocuous. But Strings Attached demonstrates that when incentives are viewed as a kind of power rather than as a form of exchange, many ethical questions arise: How do incentives affect character and institutional culture? Can incentives be manipulative or exploitative, even if people are free to refuse them? What are the responsibiliti

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Grant (Duke Univ.) examines the ethical implications of incentives, which she sees as a form of power. She first outlines her concerns about the legitimacy or illegitimacy of incentives. Next, she contends that, historically, the modern concept of incentives first arose in 20th-century America in scientific management, economic theory, and behavioral psychology. Chapter 3 establishes that incentives are external to individual behavior. Chapter 4 emphasizes the importance of the autonomous individual as the standard for ethical judgment; Grant then analyzes the power relationships often embedded in the context of an incentive. Chapter 6 offers plea bargaining, human subjects in medical research, the International Monetary Fund, and educational motivation of children as useful case studies of incentives that raise serious issues in terms of both ethics and effectiveness. In her penultimate chapter, the author reemphasizes that using voluntariness as the sole criterion for the legitimacy of a particular incentive is far too narrow for meaningful ethical analysis. Grant's conclusion is an excellent summary of the deeper democratic values threatened by unanalyzed use of incentives in public policy. This is an important contribution to both ethics and public policy. Summing Up: Highly recommended. General readers, upper-division undergraduate students, graduate students, and research faculty. R. Heineman Alfred University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Ruth W. Grant is professor of political science and philosophy and a senior fellow of the Kenan Institute for Ethics at Duke University. She is the author of John Locke's Liberalism and Hypocrisy and Integrity .

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