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Red State Religion : Faith and Politics in America's Heartland

By: Wuthnow, Robert.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, 2012Description: 1 online resource (323 p.).ISBN: 9781400839759.Subject(s): Kansas -- Politics and government | Political culture -- Kansas -- History | Religion and politics -- Kansas -- HistoryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Red State Religion : Faith and Politics in America's HeartlandDDC classification: 306.661709781 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Contents -- List of Illustrations -- Preface -- Prologue -- Murder at the Glenwood -- 1. Piety on the Plains -- Abraham Lincoln in Kansas -- Establishing a Civic Order -- Public Religion -- Serving the Community -- Church Expansion -- Cooperation and Competition -- 2. An Evolving Political Style -- Prairie Politics -- Populism and Religious Politics -- Protesting against Inequality -- A Divided Party -- Law and Order -- For the Children -- 3. Redefining the Heartland -- Harvest of Progress -- Consolidation and Expansion -- Forward-looking Initiatives -- Church and State
Hunkering Down -- Fundamentalism and the Great Depression -- Simian Peasants -- Novel Movements -- 4. Quiet Conservatism -- Grassroots Resentments -- The Senator from Pendergast -- Hometown Religion -- I Like Ike -- A Well-Qualified Catholic -- 5. An Era of Restructuring -- Stirrings on the Right -- From Desegregation to Black Power -- Nixon at Kansas State -- Division in the Churches -- 6. The Religious Right -- Mobilization on the Right -- Government Is the Problem -- The War in Wichita -- Shifting the Focus -- Questioning Evolution -- 7. Continuing the Struggle
The Churches and Activist Networks -- Electing George W. Bush -- Regulating Abortion -- The Campaign against Gay Marriage -- Evolution Revisited -- The Death of Dr. Tiller -- Swatches of Purple -- Epilogue -- Notes -- Selected Bibliography -- Index -- A -- B -- C -- D -- E -- F -- G -- H -- I -- J -- K -- L -- M -- N -- O -- P -- Q -- R -- S -- T -- U -- V -- W -- Y
Summary: No state has voted Republican more consistently or widely or for longer than Kansas. To understand red state politics, Kansas is the place. It is also the place to understand red state religion. The Kansas Board of Education has repeatedly challenged the teaching of evolution, Kansas voters overwhelmingly passed a constitutional ban on gay marriage, the state is a hotbed of antiabortion protest--and churches have been involved in all of these efforts. Yet in 1867 suffragist Lucy Stone could plausibly proclaim that, in the cause of universal suffrage, ""Kansas leads the world!"" How did Kansas
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BL65.P7 -- W88 2012 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=774048 Available EBL774048

Cover -- Contents -- List of Illustrations -- Preface -- Prologue -- Murder at the Glenwood -- 1. Piety on the Plains -- Abraham Lincoln in Kansas -- Establishing a Civic Order -- Public Religion -- Serving the Community -- Church Expansion -- Cooperation and Competition -- 2. An Evolving Political Style -- Prairie Politics -- Populism and Religious Politics -- Protesting against Inequality -- A Divided Party -- Law and Order -- For the Children -- 3. Redefining the Heartland -- Harvest of Progress -- Consolidation and Expansion -- Forward-looking Initiatives -- Church and State

Hunkering Down -- Fundamentalism and the Great Depression -- Simian Peasants -- Novel Movements -- 4. Quiet Conservatism -- Grassroots Resentments -- The Senator from Pendergast -- Hometown Religion -- I Like Ike -- A Well-Qualified Catholic -- 5. An Era of Restructuring -- Stirrings on the Right -- From Desegregation to Black Power -- Nixon at Kansas State -- Division in the Churches -- 6. The Religious Right -- Mobilization on the Right -- Government Is the Problem -- The War in Wichita -- Shifting the Focus -- Questioning Evolution -- 7. Continuing the Struggle

The Churches and Activist Networks -- Electing George W. Bush -- Regulating Abortion -- The Campaign against Gay Marriage -- Evolution Revisited -- The Death of Dr. Tiller -- Swatches of Purple -- Epilogue -- Notes -- Selected Bibliography -- Index -- A -- B -- C -- D -- E -- F -- G -- H -- I -- J -- K -- L -- M -- N -- O -- P -- Q -- R -- S -- T -- U -- V -- W -- Y

No state has voted Republican more consistently or widely or for longer than Kansas. To understand red state politics, Kansas is the place. It is also the place to understand red state religion. The Kansas Board of Education has repeatedly challenged the teaching of evolution, Kansas voters overwhelmingly passed a constitutional ban on gay marriage, the state is a hotbed of antiabortion protest--and churches have been involved in all of these efforts. Yet in 1867 suffragist Lucy Stone could plausibly proclaim that, in the cause of universal suffrage, ""Kansas leads the world!"" How did Kansas

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

For political pundits and historians alike, Kansas state politics has long been a mystery in that a largely working-class state is the most consistently Republican and conservative state in the nation. Thomas Frank's What's the Matter with Kansas? (2004) blamed the unholy alliance between religious conservatives and politicians as the core issue. Sociologist Wuthnow (Univ. of Kansas) digs further into the archival history of the state and argues that while religion and politics influenced each other from the start, Kansas politics was never monolithic. Kansas Democrats often achieved electoral success, and conservative and Republican candidates were often divided over public policy. Although Methodists and Catholics dominated the state, they frequently splintered over abolition, Prohibition, the New Deal, abortion, and education policy. Wuthnow argues that what most defines Kansas politics is its belief that civic life is best governed by local churches, families, schools, and community associations, rather than federal government engineering. Wuthnow errs in misrepresenting the intelligent design movement as merely "rhetorical strategy" that simply repackaged creationist arguments in nontheological terms, rather than recognizing its core differences in the arguments and personalities involved. Nevertheless, he at least takes Kansas state conservatism seriously in grounding his conclusions in archival research rather than journalistic sensationalism. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All academic levels/libraries. M. S. Hill Gordon College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Robert Wuthnow , a native of Kansas, teaches sociology and directs the Center for the Study of Religion at Princeton University. He is the author of many books about American religion and culture, including Remaking the Heartland: Middle America since the 1950s and Small-Town America: Finding Community, Shaping the Future (both Princeton).

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