The Lucretian Renaissance : Philology and the Afterlife of Tradition

By: Passannante, GerardMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandPublisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (260 p.)ISBN: 9780226648514Subject(s): Lucretius Carus, Titus -- Influence | Materialism -- History | Philosophy, Ancient | Philosophy, RenaissanceGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Lucretian Renaissance : Philology and the Afterlife of TraditionDDC classification: 187 LOC classification: PA6484Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents -- Introduction -- 1. Extra Destinatum -- 2. The Philologist and the Epicurean -- 3. Homer Atomized -- 4. The Pervasive Influence -- Epilogue -- Acknowledgments -- Bibliography -- Index
Summary: With The Lucretian Renaissance, Gerard Passannante offers a radical rethinking of a familiar narrative: the rise of materialism in early modern Europe. Passannante begins by taking up the ancient philosophical notion that the world is composed of two fundamental opposites: atoms, as the philosopher Epicurus theorized, intrinsically unchangeable and moving about the void; and the void itself, or nothingness. Passannante considers the fact that this strain of ancient Greek philosophy survived and was transmitted to the Renaissance primarily by means of a poem that had seemingly been lost-a poem
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Contents -- Introduction -- 1. Extra Destinatum -- 2. The Philologist and the Epicurean -- 3. Homer Atomized -- 4. The Pervasive Influence -- Epilogue -- Acknowledgments -- Bibliography -- Index

With The Lucretian Renaissance, Gerard Passannante offers a radical rethinking of a familiar narrative: the rise of materialism in early modern Europe. Passannante begins by taking up the ancient philosophical notion that the world is composed of two fundamental opposites: atoms, as the philosopher Epicurus theorized, intrinsically unchangeable and moving about the void; and the void itself, or nothingness. Passannante considers the fact that this strain of ancient Greek philosophy survived and was transmitted to the Renaissance primarily by means of a poem that had seemingly been lost-a poem

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In the wake of Stephen Greenblatt's The Swerve (CH, Mar'12, 49-3702), Passannante (English and comparative literature, Univ. of Maryland) forges another estimable link in the lengthening catena of recent Lucretian scholarship. To appropriate a phrase from the author, Lucretius is currently "in the air." Readers will be grateful for the assistance of copious footnotes and English renderings of the many Latin passages cited as Passannante guides them through the labyrinthine history of the transmission and absorption of De rerum natura, both before it was "discovered" and thereafter; he pays particular attention to the associated philological and philosophical materialities impacting the intellectual development of many seminal thinkers--Petrarch, Montaigne, Francis Bacon, Pierre Gassendi, Sir Isaac Newton, and Henry More, among others. With consummate elan, Passannante constructs an elegant exfoliative narrative characterized by comprehensive erudition and a complete command of the spectrum of scholarship relating to his purpose. Positing an analogy--derived directly from the poem itself--of Epicurean atomic particles to alphabetic letters, the author limns the formation and reformation of a text in flux, a text coextensive with the rise of Renaissance textual criticism, which exerted its pervasive influence on literary and intellectual history well into the 17th century. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. J. S. Louzonis St. Francis College, Brooklyn, NY

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Gerard Passannante is assistant professor of English and comparative literature at the University of Maryland.

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