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The Lost Promise of Patriotism : Debating American Identity, 1890-1920

By: Hansen, Jonathan M.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (278 p.).ISBN: 9780226315850.Subject(s): Democracy -- United States -- History | Intellectuals -- United States -- History | National characteristics, American | Patriotism -- United States -- History | Political activists -- United States -- History | Political culture -- United States -- History | United States -- Politics and government -- 1865-1933Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Lost Promise of Patriotism : Debating American Identity, 1890-1920DDC classification: 973.91 LOC classification: E661Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents -- Preface -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction -- 1. Patriotism Properly Understood -- 2. Room of One's Own -- 3. Democracy as Associated Learning -- 4. Ex Uno Plura -- 5. To Make Democracy Safe for the World -- 6. Fighting Words -- Conclusion: The Twilight of Ideals -- Notes -- Works Cited -- Index
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E661 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=3038263 Available EBL3038263

Contents -- Preface -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction -- 1. Patriotism Properly Understood -- 2. Room of One's Own -- 3. Democracy as Associated Learning -- 4. Ex Uno Plura -- 5. To Make Democracy Safe for the World -- 6. Fighting Words -- Conclusion: The Twilight of Ideals -- Notes -- Works Cited -- Index

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In this intriguing and challenging work, Hansen (Boston Univ.) discusses various conceptions of nationalism, patriotism, and race advanced by major progressives and reformers. Challenging conventional interpretations, the author denies that Theodore Roosevelt was a racist, since he believed that all people had the ability to "rise" from "savagery." Similarly, socialist leader Eugene V. Debs never trivialized the problem of race. Henry James's The American Scene (1907) is far from being xenophobic ranting. Similar insights, as well as relevant biographical data, are presented on other seminal figures, including social worker Jane Addams, commentator Randolph Bourne, jurist Louis Brandeis, editor Herbert Croly, educator Horace Kallen, black leader W.E.B. Du Bois, and philosophers John Dewey, William James, and Morris Cohen. Certain organizing categories are particularly perceptive, including the distinction between "univeralists," who denied the significance of national and cultural affiliation for individual development (e.g., Cohen); "pluralists," who view culture as essential to human life (e.g., Kallen); and "cosmopolitans," who see life as comprising endless negotiation between local, national, and international allegiances. Although at times the style is stilted, the research is thorough and conclusions important. Sources include various manuscripts (e.g., Addams, Debs) and both scholarly and contemporary books and articles. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. J. D. Doenecke New College of Florida

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Jonathan M. Hansen teaches history and expository writing at Boston University.

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