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History and its objects : antiquarianism and material culture since 1500 / Peter N. Miller.

By: Miller, Peter N [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Ithaca ; London : Cornell University Press, 2017Copyright date: �2017Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781501708244; 1501708244.Subject(s): Antiquities -- Study and teaching | Material culture -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Print version:: History and its objects.DDC classification: 930.1071 LOC classification: GN406Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Why historiography matters -- History and things in the twentieth century -- Karl Lamprecht and the "material turn" of 1885 -- Things as historical evidence in the late Renaissance and early Enlightenment -- Material evidence in the history curriculum in eighteenth-century G�ottingen -- Archaeology as a way of talking about things 1750-1850 -- Material culture in the amateur historical associations of early nineteenth-century Germany -- Gustav Klemm, cultural history and Culturwissenschaft -- The germanisches Nationalmuseum: antiquitates and cultural history in the museum.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
GN406 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7591/j.ctt1pc5g3z Available ocn961388393

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Why historiography matters -- History and things in the twentieth century -- Karl Lamprecht and the "material turn" of 1885 -- Things as historical evidence in the late Renaissance and early Enlightenment -- Material evidence in the history curriculum in eighteenth-century G�ottingen -- Archaeology as a way of talking about things 1750-1850 -- Material culture in the amateur historical associations of early nineteenth-century Germany -- Gustav Klemm, cultural history and Culturwissenschaft -- The germanisches Nationalmuseum: antiquitates and cultural history in the museum.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In this exploration of paths taken for collecting and using artifacts, Miller (Bard Graduate Center) examined Renaissance antiquarianism, the University of Göttingen's historical and archaeological curriculums from the late 18th century, and, finally, the development of local historical societies that had spawned the cultural-history museum movement in early- to mid-19th-century Germany. When, in the second half of the 19th century, history became a discipline in the German academy, the professoriate preferred research materials from the library with its texts, rather than the museum with its artifacts. That textual preference held in Western universities' history programs throughout the 20th century. Only in that century's last several decades have some US historians--often from the fields of art history or industrial archaeology--focused significantly on artifacts, although texts also existed. As suggested by the earlier museum movement, the new cultural historians have used objects as documents to provide evidence concerning a number of social and aesthetic dimensions--such as taste, fashion, customs, and work practices--beyond those revealed by texts. Miller brings to the surface a "submerged history" of things--a context useful to historiographers, anthropologists, and archaeologists. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students/faculty/professionals. --James L. Cooper, DePauw University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Peter N. Miller is Dean and Professor at Bard Graduate Center. He is the author most recently of Peiresc's Mediterranean World , editor of Cultural Histories of the Material World , and coeditor of Antiquarianism and Intellectual Life in Europe and China, 1500-1800. </p>

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