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City of inmates : conquest, rebellion, and the rise of human caging in Los Angeles, 1771-1965 / by Kelly Lytle Hern�andez.

By: Hernandez, Kelly Lytle [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Justice, power, and politics: Publisher: Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, [2017]Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781469631196; 1469631199.Subject(s): Imprisonment -- California -- Los Angeles -- History | Discrimination in criminal justice administration -- California -- Los Angeles -- History | Criminal justice, Administration of -- California -- Los Angeles -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Print version:: City of inmates.DDC classification: 365/.97949409 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Half Title; Title; Copyright; Contents; Introduction. Conquest and Incarceration; 1 An Eliminatory Option; 2 Hobos in Heaven; 3 Not Imprisonment in a Legal Sense; 4 Scorpion's Tale; 5 Caged Birds; 6 Justice for Samuel Faulkner; Conclusion. Upriver in the Age of Mass Incarceration; The Rebel Archive; Notes; Bibliography; Acknowledgments; Index; A; B; C; D; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z
Summary: "Marshaling more than two centuries of evidence, historian Kelly Lytle Hern�andez unmasks how histories of native elimination, immigrant exclusion, and black disappearance drove the rise of incarceration in Los Angeles. In this telling, which spans from the Spanish colonial era to the outbreak of the 1965 Watts Rebellion, Hern�andez documents the persistent historical bond between the racial fantasies of conquest, namely its settler colonial form, and the eliminatory capacities of incarceration"-- Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HV9956.L67 H47 2017 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5149/9781469631196_hernandez Available ocn974947592

Includes bibliographical references and index.

"Marshaling more than two centuries of evidence, historian Kelly Lytle Hern�andez unmasks how histories of native elimination, immigrant exclusion, and black disappearance drove the rise of incarceration in Los Angeles. In this telling, which spans from the Spanish colonial era to the outbreak of the 1965 Watts Rebellion, Hern�andez documents the persistent historical bond between the racial fantasies of conquest, namely its settler colonial form, and the eliminatory capacities of incarceration"-- Provided by publisher.

Print version record.

Cover; Half Title; Title; Copyright; Contents; Introduction. Conquest and Incarceration; 1 An Eliminatory Option; 2 Hobos in Heaven; 3 Not Imprisonment in a Legal Sense; 4 Scorpion's Tale; 5 Caged Birds; 6 Justice for Samuel Faulkner; Conclusion. Upriver in the Age of Mass Incarceration; The Rebel Archive; Notes; Bibliography; Acknowledgments; Index; A; B; C; D; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

No metropolis has been more loved and, of course, more hated than Los Angeles. What has been missing, though, is a history of incarceration in the second-largest city in the US. Hernandez (history, UCLA) fills this void with her text, which begins, "Mass incarceration is mass elimination." In this long, historical view of incarceration in the city of Los Angeles, readers learn that two centuries of data collection have uncovered the long arm of the law. The vast billion-dollar system of jails, detention centers, prison farms, and two federal prisons locks up approximately 17,000 men, women, and youth each night. This case study of Los Angeles is an excellent addition to the sociological, economic, and psychological works that have excavated the various ways the US has become the leader in incarceration globally. Hernandez puts in perspective the arrests, convictions, and incarceration for one city that contributes to the US being the carceral capital of the world. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students, faculty. --Earl Smith, Wake Forest University

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