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The life and times of General Andrew Pickens : Revolutionary War hero, American founder / Rod Andrew Jr.

By: Andrew, Rod, Jr.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, [2017]Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781469631547; 1469631547; 9781469631554; 1469631555.Subject(s): Generals -- United States -- Biography | Legislators -- United States -- BiographyAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Life and times of General Andrew Pickens.DDC classification: 975.7/03092 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Family pilgrimage -- Family, war, and order -- The backcountry militia -- Defending the new order, 1777-1779 -- Liberty and virtue in a conquered land -- The "brave and valuable" Colonel Pickens : the Cowpens campaign -- The North Carolina campaign -- Fighting his way back home -- Ninety Six and Eutaw -- A state of alarm and confusion -- Rebuilding civil society -- General Pickens, Indian Treaty commissioner -- The struggle for peace -- The strong hand of government, 1789-1793 -- War, peace, and corruption, 1793-1797 -- Every thing that was possible for men of honor to do -- Retirement and looking back.
Summary: "Though best known as a Revolutionary War general, Andrew Pickens (1739-1817) was more than just an influential military figure in the early American republic, also serving as a church leader, justice of the peace, legislator, and congressman. In this book, Rod Andrew Jr. offers the first comprehensive biography of Pickens, a hero at the pivotal Battle of Cowpens, in over a generation. Andrew defines his subject as a man of action, analyzing his motivations in context of the tumultuous and often violent landscape of early America. Andrew ... depicts the life of Pickens as he founds churches, acquires slaves, joins in the fight against the British in the American Revolution, and struggles over Indian territorial boundaries on the southern frontier"-- Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E207.P63 A63 2017 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5149/9781469631547_andrew Available ocn974947599

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Family pilgrimage -- Family, war, and order -- The backcountry militia -- Defending the new order, 1777-1779 -- Liberty and virtue in a conquered land -- The "brave and valuable" Colonel Pickens : the Cowpens campaign -- The North Carolina campaign -- Fighting his way back home -- Ninety Six and Eutaw -- A state of alarm and confusion -- Rebuilding civil society -- General Pickens, Indian Treaty commissioner -- The struggle for peace -- The strong hand of government, 1789-1793 -- War, peace, and corruption, 1793-1797 -- Every thing that was possible for men of honor to do -- Retirement and looking back.

"Though best known as a Revolutionary War general, Andrew Pickens (1739-1817) was more than just an influential military figure in the early American republic, also serving as a church leader, justice of the peace, legislator, and congressman. In this book, Rod Andrew Jr. offers the first comprehensive biography of Pickens, a hero at the pivotal Battle of Cowpens, in over a generation. Andrew defines his subject as a man of action, analyzing his motivations in context of the tumultuous and often violent landscape of early America. Andrew ... depicts the life of Pickens as he founds churches, acquires slaves, joins in the fight against the British in the American Revolution, and struggles over Indian territorial boundaries on the southern frontier"-- Provided by publisher.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Andrew (Clemson) provides a comprehensive biography of Andrew Pickens, a backcountry planter, general, and diplomat on the southeastern frontier in the era of the American Revolution and new nation. He uses Pickens to provide a history of life in the South Carolina backcountry for white settlers, particularly the Scots-Irish who predominated in that area. In Andrew's telling, Pickens was heavily influenced by the Presbyterianism on which he was raised and a desire for order rooted in the violence, disruption, and destruction that resulted from a series of conflicts with Native Americans and the War of Independence. Andrew deserves credit for trying to better incorporate Pickens's treatment of slaves and Native Americans throughout his life. Relationships between settlers and Indians were complex. The author portrays Pickens as a man who desired a just and humane American policy toward Native Americans but who also led a series of destructive campaigns against the Creeks and the Cherokees. Similarly, Andrew claims that Pickens was trying to reconcile slavery with his religion and morality. The author's overreliance on white sources, however, limits his ability to be critical of his subject. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students, faculty. --Jonathan Mercantini, Kean University

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