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Theater of a separate war : the Civil War west of the Mississippi River, 1861-1865 / Thomas W. Cutrer.

By: Cutrer, Thomas W [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Littlefield history of the Civil War era: Publisher: Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, [2017]Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781469631578; 1469631571; 9781469631585; 146963158X.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Theater of a separate war.DDC classification: 973.7/3 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Has it come so soon as this? Secession and Confederate statehood -- I will gladly give my life for a victory: Kansas and Missouri, June-December 1861 -- The wolf is come: war in the Indian nation, 1861-1862 -- The only man in the army that was whipped: the Pea Ridge campaign, February 1862 -- Charge 'em! damn 'em, charge, charge, charge! The struggle for the Southwest, July 1861-July 1862 -- We are men and braves: Indian warfare in the Far West -- No feeling of mercy or kindness: the Prairie Grove campaign, March 1862-January 1863 -- Hold out till help arrived or until all dead: the capture of Arkansas post, 9-11 January 1863 -- Texas must take her chances: coastal defense and the battle of Galveston, April 1861-January 1863 -- All New England men and of the best material: the federal occupation of south Louisiana, April 1862-April 1863 -- Cannot you do something to operate against them on your side of the river! Milliken's Bend and the campaign for Vicksburg, spring 1863 -- Courage and desperation rarely equaled: the rebel assault on Helena, 4 July 1863 -- Much unmerited loss and suffering: Quantrill's Lawrence raid and the war on the Missouri-Kansas border, 21 August 1863 -- Drive him routed from our soil: the Little Rock campaign, July-October 1863 -- More remarkable than Thermopylae: Texas coastal defense and the battle of Sabine Pass, January 1863-June 1865 -- Our troops should occupy and hold at least a portion of Texas: Banks's overland campaign, July-November 1863 -- The land of coyotes, tarantulas, fandangos, horn-toads, and jack-rabbits: Banks's Texas campaign, October 1863-August 1864 -- No nobler death: the Indian Territory, July 1863-February 1865 -- We must fight them and whip them: Banks's drive toward Shreveport, November 1863-April 1864 -- I am going to fight Banks if he has a million of men! the battles of Mansfield and Pleasant Hill, 8-9 April 1864 -- A brisk and brilliant six weeks' campaign: Steele's Camden expedition and Banks's retreat from Pleasant Hill, April and May 1864 -- Destroy property and recruit men: Price's Missouri raid, August-November 1864 -- Let come what will, we'll fight the Yankees alone: Confederate collapse in the Trans-Mississippi.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E470.9 .C87 2017 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5149/9781469631578_cutrer Available ocn976434080

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Has it come so soon as this? Secession and Confederate statehood -- I will gladly give my life for a victory: Kansas and Missouri, June-December 1861 -- The wolf is come: war in the Indian nation, 1861-1862 -- The only man in the army that was whipped: the Pea Ridge campaign, February 1862 -- Charge 'em! damn 'em, charge, charge, charge! The struggle for the Southwest, July 1861-July 1862 -- We are men and braves: Indian warfare in the Far West -- No feeling of mercy or kindness: the Prairie Grove campaign, March 1862-January 1863 -- Hold out till help arrived or until all dead: the capture of Arkansas post, 9-11 January 1863 -- Texas must take her chances: coastal defense and the battle of Galveston, April 1861-January 1863 -- All New England men and of the best material: the federal occupation of south Louisiana, April 1862-April 1863 -- Cannot you do something to operate against them on your side of the river! Milliken's Bend and the campaign for Vicksburg, spring 1863 -- Courage and desperation rarely equaled: the rebel assault on Helena, 4 July 1863 -- Much unmerited loss and suffering: Quantrill's Lawrence raid and the war on the Missouri-Kansas border, 21 August 1863 -- Drive him routed from our soil: the Little Rock campaign, July-October 1863 -- More remarkable than Thermopylae: Texas coastal defense and the battle of Sabine Pass, January 1863-June 1865 -- Our troops should occupy and hold at least a portion of Texas: Banks's overland campaign, July-November 1863 -- The land of coyotes, tarantulas, fandangos, horn-toads, and jack-rabbits: Banks's Texas campaign, October 1863-August 1864 -- No nobler death: the Indian Territory, July 1863-February 1865 -- We must fight them and whip them: Banks's drive toward Shreveport, November 1863-April 1864 -- I am going to fight Banks if he has a million of men! the battles of Mansfield and Pleasant Hill, 8-9 April 1864 -- A brisk and brilliant six weeks' campaign: Steele's Camden expedition and Banks's retreat from Pleasant Hill, April and May 1864 -- Destroy property and recruit men: Price's Missouri raid, August-November 1864 -- Let come what will, we'll fight the Yankees alone: Confederate collapse in the Trans-Mississippi.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This latest volume in the distinguished "Littlefield History of the Civil War Era" series continues the high standards of scholarship and accessibility that series has established. Cutrer (emer., Arizona State Univ.) provides what will surely become the standard history of the Trans-Mississippi theater. He brings together the military and political aspects of the war in the far West, with a deep appreciation of the distances involved. For example, his discussion of the various campaigns that went back and forth in Missouri (perhaps the most studied part of the theater) is both fresh and insightful. The author's great contribution is to provide a strong narrative that makes clear the trans-Mississippi was more significant in the war than is often realized, and everyone interested in the Civil War at any level will find a great deal in this book. It was not that long ago that Civil War scholarship was dominated by the eastern theater. Adding the western theater expands understanding of the war. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. --William H Mulligan, Murray State University

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