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Sentencing Matters.

By: Tonry, Michael.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Studies in Crime and Public Policy: Publisher: Cary : Oxford University Press, 2014Copyright date: ©1997Description: 1 online resource (233 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780198025535.Subject(s): Electronic books. -- local | Sentences (Criminal procedure) | Sentences (Criminal procedure) -- United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Sentencing MattersDDC classification: 345.730772 LOC classification: KF9685 -- .T66 1997Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents -- 1. Sentencing Matters -- I. Twenty-Five Years of Sentencing Ferment -- II. The Injustice of Just Deserts -- 2. Reforming Sentencing -- I. Experience with Commissions -- II. Issues Facing Commissions -- III. The Future of the Sentencing Commission -- 3. The Federal Sentencing Guidelines -- I. Early Experience with Federal Guidelines -- II. Evaluations of the Guidelines -- III. Why the Commission Failed -- IV. Salvaging the Federal Guidelines -- 4. Intermediate Sanctions -- I. General Impediments to Effective Intermediate Sanctions -- II. Experience with Intermediate Sanctions -- III. Is There a Future for Intermediate Sanctions? -- 5. Mandatory Penalties -- I. Deterrent Effects -- II. Mandatory Penalties before 1970 -- III. Mandatory Penalties in the 1970s, 1980s, 1990s -- IV. Mandatory Penalties as Instruments and Symbols -- 6. Judges and Sentencing Policy -- I. Eliciting Judicial Participation and Support -- II. Training -- III. Implications -- 7. Sentencing Reform in Comparative Perspective -- I. Discretion and Disparity -- II. Learning Across Jurisdictional Boundaries -- III. Proportionality with a Human Face -- IV. Desert and Disparity -- 8. "What Is to Be Done?" -- References -- Index -- A -- B -- C -- D -- E -- F -- G -- H -- I -- J -- K -- L -- M -- N -- O -- P -- Q -- R -- S -- T -- U -- V -- W -- Y -- Z.
Summary: "Tonry has written the most inclusive and up-to-date study of American sentencing practices now available. To my knowledge, no other work approaches Sentencing Matters' field of vision, particularly in its sustained attention to developments in the states. No other scholar has taken on the painstaking and unglamorous work of learning what so many jurisdictions are doing--and then keeping up with their progress over time. The tedious nature of this effort should not be undersold....Without Michael Tonry, virtually no literature on state sentencing would exist....[His] intellectual center of gravity is different from the image sometimes offered of legal scholars, that they speak only to each other and are disdainful of practitioners....Tonry runs contrary to stereotype: the influence of his work over the years has not been due to the intricacy of his theories or the fluency of his writing style. Instead, his achievements have come from knowing what he is talking about....Sentencing Matters is a compendium of the best work of the leading scholar on American sentencing innovations."--Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
KF9685 -- .T66 1997 (Browse shelf) http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=241357 Available EBC241357

Contents -- 1. Sentencing Matters -- I. Twenty-Five Years of Sentencing Ferment -- II. The Injustice of Just Deserts -- 2. Reforming Sentencing -- I. Experience with Commissions -- II. Issues Facing Commissions -- III. The Future of the Sentencing Commission -- 3. The Federal Sentencing Guidelines -- I. Early Experience with Federal Guidelines -- II. Evaluations of the Guidelines -- III. Why the Commission Failed -- IV. Salvaging the Federal Guidelines -- 4. Intermediate Sanctions -- I. General Impediments to Effective Intermediate Sanctions -- II. Experience with Intermediate Sanctions -- III. Is There a Future for Intermediate Sanctions? -- 5. Mandatory Penalties -- I. Deterrent Effects -- II. Mandatory Penalties before 1970 -- III. Mandatory Penalties in the 1970s, 1980s, 1990s -- IV. Mandatory Penalties as Instruments and Symbols -- 6. Judges and Sentencing Policy -- I. Eliciting Judicial Participation and Support -- II. Training -- III. Implications -- 7. Sentencing Reform in Comparative Perspective -- I. Discretion and Disparity -- II. Learning Across Jurisdictional Boundaries -- III. Proportionality with a Human Face -- IV. Desert and Disparity -- 8. "What Is to Be Done?" -- References -- Index -- A -- B -- C -- D -- E -- F -- G -- H -- I -- J -- K -- L -- M -- N -- O -- P -- Q -- R -- S -- T -- U -- V -- W -- Y -- Z.

"Tonry has written the most inclusive and up-to-date study of American sentencing practices now available. To my knowledge, no other work approaches Sentencing Matters' field of vision, particularly in its sustained attention to developments in the states. No other scholar has taken on the painstaking and unglamorous work of learning what so many jurisdictions are doing--and then keeping up with their progress over time. The tedious nature of this effort should not be undersold....Without Michael Tonry, virtually no literature on state sentencing would exist....[His] intellectual center of gravity is different from the image sometimes offered of legal scholars, that they speak only to each other and are disdainful of practitioners....Tonry runs contrary to stereotype: the influence of his work over the years has not been due to the intricacy of his theories or the fluency of his writing style. Instead, his achievements have come from knowing what he is talking about....Sentencing Matters is a compendium of the best work of the leading scholar on American sentencing innovations."--Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology.

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Author notes provided by Syndetics

Michael Tonry is Sonosky Professor of Law and Public Policy at the University of Minnesota, and editor of the journals Crime and Justice: A Review of Research and Overcrowded Times. He is the author or editor of several well-regarded books on crime and punishment.

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