Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Risk-Based Analysis for Environmental Managers.

By: Frantzen, Kurt A.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Baton Rouge : CRC Press, 2016Copyright date: ©2002Edition: 1st ed.Description: 1 online resource (257 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781420032901.Subject(s): Brownfields -- United States -- Evaluation | Environmental management -- United States | Environmental risk assessment -- United States | Hazardous waste sites -- United States -- Evaluation | Industrial real estate -- Environmental aspects -- United States | Risk management -- United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Risk-Based Analysis for Environmental ManagersDDC classification: 363.739 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
PREFACE -- EDITOR -- CONTRIBUTORS -- ACKNOWLEDGMENTS -- TABLE OF CONTENTS -- Chapter 1 -- I. Introduction -- A. THE NEED FOR AN ECOSYSTEMS PERSPECTIVE -- B. ENVIRONMENTAL RISK MANAGEMENT AND THE "SYSTEMS APPROACH" -- II. RISK-BASED ANALYSIS -- A. Introduction -- 1. Risk Analysis -- 2. Risk Assessment -- 3. Risk Management -- 4. Risk Communications -- 5. Risk-Based Corrective Action -- B. OVERVIEW OF RISK-BASED ANALYSIS -- C. RISKS AND REWARDS -- III. OUTLINE OF CHAPTERS -- A. ENVIRONMENTAL RISK MANAGEMENT -- B. INTERFACING THE ASSESSMENT, MANAGEMENT, AND COMMUNICATION OF RISK -- C. THE PRACTICE OF RISK-BASED ANALYSIS -- D. APPENDICES -- 1. Appendix A. Evolution of the Risk Paradigm -- 2. Appendix B. Evaluating Financial Liability Implications of Environmental Risks -- 3. Appendix C. Risk Communication Basics -- 4. Appendix D. Risk-Based AnalysisWorkbook -- 5. Appendix E. Acronyms and Glossary -- Chapter 2 -- I. Introduction -- II. HOW RISK IS DEFINED -- A. ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINATION: A CORPORATE CAUSE CÉLÈBRE -- 1. As a Health and Ecological Peril and Concern -- 2. As a Legal Concern -- 3. As an Image Concern -- 4. As a Financial Concern -- B. EVOLUTION OF THE REGULATORY RISK ASSESSMENT/ MANAGEMENT/COMMUNICATION PARADIGM -- C. THE CURRENT "RISK-BASED" MOVEMENT -- D. THE PRECAUTIONARY PRINCIPLE -- III. THE MANAGEMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL RISK -- A. CLASSICAL RISK MANAGEMENT -- B. ENVIRONMENTAL RISK MANAGEMENT -- C. THE PROBLEM: MANAGING HOW RISK IS DEFINED -- IV. A MULTIDIMENSIONAL VIEW OF ENVIRONMENTAL IMPAIRMENT AND THE ASSOCIATED RISKS -- A. VIEWING RISK FROM MULTIPLE PERSPECTIVES -- 1. Risk and Rationality -- 2. Framing -- 3. Shared Understanding and Legitimization -- B. INTEGRATING A BIPOLAR ISSUE -- V. MANAGING THE DEFINITION OF THE RISK -- A. DEFINING LOSS EXPOSURE AS HAZARD, RISK, AND COST -- B. DEFINING RISK SYNOPTICALLY.
1. Risk Importance -- 2. Risk as Harm -- 3. Risk Significance -- 4. Appreciating Uncertainty -- C. MANAGING THE DEFINITION OF RISK -- Chapter 3 -- I. INTRODUCTION -- II. RISK ASSESSMENT: THE JOB EVERYONE HATES -- A. HUMAN HEALTH RISK ASSESSMENT -- 1. The View from Toxicology -- 2. Defining Exposure -- 3. Characterizing Risk -- B. ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT -- 1. Problem Formulation -- 2. Hazard Identification -- 3. Exposure Assessment -- 4. Toxicity Assessment -- 5. Risk Characterization -- C. ACKNOWLEDGING UNCERTAINTY: THE RISE OF PROBABILISTIC RISK ASSESSMENT -- D. INFORMATION DEVELOPMENT, NOT PROBLEM SOLVING -- 1. Use in Developing Environmental Site Assessment Plans -- 2. What Risk Assessment Does and Does Not Tell You -- 3. Use in Determining the Need for Remediation or Corrective Action -- 4. Use in Developing Cleanup Goals -- 5. Use in Selecting Potential Remedial Alternatives -- 6. Use in Evaluating the Risk of Remedy -- 7. Use in Planning of Post-Remediation Activities -- III. RISK MANAGEMENT: THE JOB EVERYONE WANTS -- A. THE REGULATOR'S JOB -- B. THE VIEW OF OTHERS -- C. THE RISK MANAGER IS A PROCESS, NOT A PERSON -- IV. RISK COMMUNICATION: THE JOB NOBODY WANTS -- A. NECESSARY AND DIFFICULT -- B. MEETING THE CHALLENGE -- V. MANAGING THE INTERFACE -- Å. ENVIRONMENTAL NEGOTIATIONS -- B. KNOWLEDGE-BASED NETWORKS -- C. THE VALUE OF RISK-BASED ANALYSIS -- Chapter 4 -- I. INTRODUCTION -- II. PROBLEM FORMULATION -- A. DEFINE: PROBLEM, DECISION, DATA AND PROCESS -- B. DEFINE THE PROBLEM -- 1. Assemble Available Background Information -- 2. Analyze the Problem -- 3. Conceptual Modeling to Aid Problem Definition -- C. DEFINE THE DECISION -- D. INFORM THE DECISION: DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES -- E. PLAN THE REST OF THE PROCESS -- III. SITUATION ANALYSIS -- A. INTEGRATING PERSPECTIVE, ANTICIPATING ISSUES -- B. PLAYERS -- C. ISSUES.
D. PROBLEM FORMULATION UPDATE -- IV. MANAGING THE RISK ASSESSMENT -- V. RISK MANAGEMENT OPTIONS -- A. BASIS FOR ACTION -- B. GOALS, OBJECTIVES, AND ENDPOINTS -- C. REMEDIAL OPTIONS -- D. VALUE CREATION -- VI. DEVELOPING RISK ARGUMENTS -- VII. REDEVELOPMENT AS REMEDIATION OR ENVIRONMENTAL AND ECONOMIC FUSION -- A. OVERHAULING CONVENTION -- 1. Economically Viable Sites -- 2. Marginal Sites -- 3. Upside-Down Sites -- B. UPSIZING SITES: OUTSIDE-THE-BOX THINKING -- C. NEW PARADIGM: VALUE CREATION -- 1. Identifies Barriers -- 2. Considers Economic Catalysts -- 3. Benefits of Upsizing -- D. THE FUTURE IS IN THE PAST AND THE GAIN IS IN THE LOSS -- Appendix A -- I. HISTORICAL CONTEXT -- II. THE NAS "RED BOOK" -- III. RISE OF THE RISK-BASED CORRECTIVE ACTION CONCEPT -- IV. THE NAS "BLUE BOOK" -- V. UNDERSTANDING RISK: INFORMING DECISIONS IN A DEMOCRATIC SOCIETY -- A. DECISION-DRIVEN: INFORMING CHOICES, SOLVING PROBLEMS -- B. CONSIDER RELEVANT LOSSES, HARMS, OR CONSEQUENCES -- C. APPLY AN ANALYTIC-DELIBERATIVE PROCESS -- D. STARTWITH PROVISIONAL ASSESSMENT OF THE DECISION -- E. NEED FOR PROBLEM FORMULATION -- F. A MUTUAL AND ITERATIVE PROCESS -- G. DEVELOPING ORGANIZATIONAL CAPABILITY -- VI. FRAMEWORK FOR ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH RISK MANAGEMENT -- A. DEFINING THE PROBLEM -- B. ANALYZING RISKS -- C. EXAMINING OPTIONS -- D. MAKING A DECISION -- E. TAKING ACTION -- F. EVALUATING RESULTS -- VII. USEPA'S REMEDY SELECTION RULES OF THUMB -- A. RISK ASSESSMENT RULES OF THUMB -- 1. Conceptual Site Model -- 2. Exposure Pathways -- 3. Data Needs -- 4. Site-Specific Risk Calculations -- 5. Other Measures of Risk -- 6. Exposed Populations -- 7. Ecological Risk Assessment -- B. RISK MANAGEMENT RULES OF THUMB -- 1. Basis for Action -- 2. Preliminary Remediation Goals-Carcinogens -- 3. Preliminary Remediation Goals-Non-carcinogens -- 4. Chemical-Specific ARARs.
5. Background Concentrations -- 6. Selecting Remedial Action -- 7. Timing -- VIII. ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT GUIDANCE -- IX. COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT -- A. DIALOGUE -- B. PARTNERSHIPS -- C. ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE -- D. STAKEHOLDER INVOLVEMENT -- X. PROBABILISTIC RISK ASSESSMENT -- XI. PERSPECTIVES FROM STATE INITIATIVES AND VOLUNTARY CLEANUP PROGRAMS -- XII. INTERNATIONAL RISK ASSESSMENT PERSPECTIVE -- Appendix B -- I. A FINANCIAL PERSPECTIVE -- II. FINANCING ENVIRONMENTAL RISK MANAGEMENT -- A. CAPITAL EXPENDITURES -- B. OPERATING EXPENSES -- C. RESERVE EXPENDITURES -- D. COMPARISON OF FINANCING TYPES -- III. BUILDING SHAREHOLDER VALUE FROM PROJECT COSTS -- IV. COMPARING AND OPTIMIZING STRATEGIES -- V. EVALUATING A CORPORATE PORTFOLIO -- VI. THE NEED FOR BETTER ANALYSIS -- Appendix C -- I. INTRODUCTION -- II. "THE RULES" -- RULE 1. Once brought into the public eye because of your association with a -- RULE 2. The "facts of life" of Rule 1 lead to the second rule of -- RULE 3. The third rule is the hardest for most engineers and executives to -- III. THE FOUR PRIORITIES OF PUBLIC COMMUNICATION -- A. FOR EACH AUDIENCE, DEFINE THE RISK -- B. DESCRIBE ACTIONS THAT MITIGATE THE RISK -- C. IDENTIFY THE CAUSE OF THE RISK -- D. DEMONSTRATE RESPONSIBLE MANAGEMENT ACTION -- IV. DECISION PRIORITIES -- A. TO WHOM MUST WE COMMUNICATE AND IN WHAT PRIORITY? -- B. WHAT ARE THE KEY POINTS FOR EACH OF THE DIFFERENT PUBLICS? -- C. WHEN DOES THE COMPANY FIRST COMMUNICATE? -- D. WHAT VEHICLE SHOULD BE USED TO COMMUNICATE? -- E. WHO SHOULD DO THE COMMUNICATING? -- F. WHAT IS THE APPROPRIATE LEVEL OF BACKGROUND FOR EACH AUDIENCE? -- G. FROM WHERE DO YOU COMMUNICATE? -- H. ARE AUTHORITIES LIMITING COMMUNICATIONS (EITHER CONTENT, TIMING, SCOPE, OR MEDIA), AND SHOULD THE COMPANY COOPERATE WITH THESE LIMITATIONS?.
I. WHAT IS THE DECISION OR APPROVAL PROCESS FOR STATEMENTS THAT THE COMPANY MAY MAKE? -- V. DEVELOPING A COMMUNICATIONS STRATEGY AND PLAN -- Appendix D -- Table D.1 Risk-Based Analysis: Five Progressive, Knowledge-Building Value Points -- Table D.2 Problem Formulation Background Information Checklist -- Table D.3 Problem Formulation Initial Problem Statement -- Table D.4 Problem Formulation Conceptual Site Model -- Table D.5 Problem Formulation Defining the Decision: Issues Analysis -- Table D.6 Problem Formulation Defining the Decision: Objective Issue Typology -- Table D.7 Problem Formulation Defining the Decision -- Table D.8 Problem Formulation Informing the Decision -- Table D.9 Problem Formulation Planning the Rest of the Process -- Table D.10 Situation Analysis Defining the Decision: Players -- Table D.11 Situation Analysis Defining the Decision: Issues -- Table D.12 Situation Analysis Defining the Decision: Subjective Issue Typology -- Table D.13 Situation Analysis Problem Formulation Update -- Table D.14 Managing the Risk Assessment Rules-of-Thumb for a Baseline Assessment -- Table D.15 Managing the Risk Assessment -- Table D.16 Risk Management Options Rules-of-Thumb -- Table D.17 Integrating Remedial/Corrective Action and Redevelopment Plans -- Table D.18 Risk Arguments -- Appendix E -- I. ACRONYMS -- II. GLOSSARY -- REFERENCES.
Summary: Reality-Based Management, Kurt A. Frantzen and Jerry AckermanEnvironmental Risk Management, Kurt A. FrantzenInterfacing the Assessment, Management, and Communication of Risk, Cris Williams, Kurt A. Frantzen, and Judy VangalioThe Practice of Risk-Based Analysis, Kurt A. Frantzen, Cris Williams, Judy Vangalio, and Jerry AckermanAPPENDICESEvolution of the Risk Paradigm, Cris WilliamsEvaluating Financial Liability Implications of Environmental Risks, John RosengardRisk Communication Basics, Sam OstrowRisk-Based Analysis Workbook, Kurt A. Frantzen, Judy Vangalio, and Cris Williams.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HD257.5.R56 2002 (Browse shelf) http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=264362 Available EBC264362

PREFACE -- EDITOR -- CONTRIBUTORS -- ACKNOWLEDGMENTS -- TABLE OF CONTENTS -- Chapter 1 -- I. Introduction -- A. THE NEED FOR AN ECOSYSTEMS PERSPECTIVE -- B. ENVIRONMENTAL RISK MANAGEMENT AND THE "SYSTEMS APPROACH" -- II. RISK-BASED ANALYSIS -- A. Introduction -- 1. Risk Analysis -- 2. Risk Assessment -- 3. Risk Management -- 4. Risk Communications -- 5. Risk-Based Corrective Action -- B. OVERVIEW OF RISK-BASED ANALYSIS -- C. RISKS AND REWARDS -- III. OUTLINE OF CHAPTERS -- A. ENVIRONMENTAL RISK MANAGEMENT -- B. INTERFACING THE ASSESSMENT, MANAGEMENT, AND COMMUNICATION OF RISK -- C. THE PRACTICE OF RISK-BASED ANALYSIS -- D. APPENDICES -- 1. Appendix A. Evolution of the Risk Paradigm -- 2. Appendix B. Evaluating Financial Liability Implications of Environmental Risks -- 3. Appendix C. Risk Communication Basics -- 4. Appendix D. Risk-Based AnalysisWorkbook -- 5. Appendix E. Acronyms and Glossary -- Chapter 2 -- I. Introduction -- II. HOW RISK IS DEFINED -- A. ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINATION: A CORPORATE CAUSE CÉLÈBRE -- 1. As a Health and Ecological Peril and Concern -- 2. As a Legal Concern -- 3. As an Image Concern -- 4. As a Financial Concern -- B. EVOLUTION OF THE REGULATORY RISK ASSESSMENT/ MANAGEMENT/COMMUNICATION PARADIGM -- C. THE CURRENT "RISK-BASED" MOVEMENT -- D. THE PRECAUTIONARY PRINCIPLE -- III. THE MANAGEMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL RISK -- A. CLASSICAL RISK MANAGEMENT -- B. ENVIRONMENTAL RISK MANAGEMENT -- C. THE PROBLEM: MANAGING HOW RISK IS DEFINED -- IV. A MULTIDIMENSIONAL VIEW OF ENVIRONMENTAL IMPAIRMENT AND THE ASSOCIATED RISKS -- A. VIEWING RISK FROM MULTIPLE PERSPECTIVES -- 1. Risk and Rationality -- 2. Framing -- 3. Shared Understanding and Legitimization -- B. INTEGRATING A BIPOLAR ISSUE -- V. MANAGING THE DEFINITION OF THE RISK -- A. DEFINING LOSS EXPOSURE AS HAZARD, RISK, AND COST -- B. DEFINING RISK SYNOPTICALLY.

1. Risk Importance -- 2. Risk as Harm -- 3. Risk Significance -- 4. Appreciating Uncertainty -- C. MANAGING THE DEFINITION OF RISK -- Chapter 3 -- I. INTRODUCTION -- II. RISK ASSESSMENT: THE JOB EVERYONE HATES -- A. HUMAN HEALTH RISK ASSESSMENT -- 1. The View from Toxicology -- 2. Defining Exposure -- 3. Characterizing Risk -- B. ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT -- 1. Problem Formulation -- 2. Hazard Identification -- 3. Exposure Assessment -- 4. Toxicity Assessment -- 5. Risk Characterization -- C. ACKNOWLEDGING UNCERTAINTY: THE RISE OF PROBABILISTIC RISK ASSESSMENT -- D. INFORMATION DEVELOPMENT, NOT PROBLEM SOLVING -- 1. Use in Developing Environmental Site Assessment Plans -- 2. What Risk Assessment Does and Does Not Tell You -- 3. Use in Determining the Need for Remediation or Corrective Action -- 4. Use in Developing Cleanup Goals -- 5. Use in Selecting Potential Remedial Alternatives -- 6. Use in Evaluating the Risk of Remedy -- 7. Use in Planning of Post-Remediation Activities -- III. RISK MANAGEMENT: THE JOB EVERYONE WANTS -- A. THE REGULATOR'S JOB -- B. THE VIEW OF OTHERS -- C. THE RISK MANAGER IS A PROCESS, NOT A PERSON -- IV. RISK COMMUNICATION: THE JOB NOBODY WANTS -- A. NECESSARY AND DIFFICULT -- B. MEETING THE CHALLENGE -- V. MANAGING THE INTERFACE -- Å. ENVIRONMENTAL NEGOTIATIONS -- B. KNOWLEDGE-BASED NETWORKS -- C. THE VALUE OF RISK-BASED ANALYSIS -- Chapter 4 -- I. INTRODUCTION -- II. PROBLEM FORMULATION -- A. DEFINE: PROBLEM, DECISION, DATA AND PROCESS -- B. DEFINE THE PROBLEM -- 1. Assemble Available Background Information -- 2. Analyze the Problem -- 3. Conceptual Modeling to Aid Problem Definition -- C. DEFINE THE DECISION -- D. INFORM THE DECISION: DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES -- E. PLAN THE REST OF THE PROCESS -- III. SITUATION ANALYSIS -- A. INTEGRATING PERSPECTIVE, ANTICIPATING ISSUES -- B. PLAYERS -- C. ISSUES.

D. PROBLEM FORMULATION UPDATE -- IV. MANAGING THE RISK ASSESSMENT -- V. RISK MANAGEMENT OPTIONS -- A. BASIS FOR ACTION -- B. GOALS, OBJECTIVES, AND ENDPOINTS -- C. REMEDIAL OPTIONS -- D. VALUE CREATION -- VI. DEVELOPING RISK ARGUMENTS -- VII. REDEVELOPMENT AS REMEDIATION OR ENVIRONMENTAL AND ECONOMIC FUSION -- A. OVERHAULING CONVENTION -- 1. Economically Viable Sites -- 2. Marginal Sites -- 3. Upside-Down Sites -- B. UPSIZING SITES: OUTSIDE-THE-BOX THINKING -- C. NEW PARADIGM: VALUE CREATION -- 1. Identifies Barriers -- 2. Considers Economic Catalysts -- 3. Benefits of Upsizing -- D. THE FUTURE IS IN THE PAST AND THE GAIN IS IN THE LOSS -- Appendix A -- I. HISTORICAL CONTEXT -- II. THE NAS "RED BOOK" -- III. RISE OF THE RISK-BASED CORRECTIVE ACTION CONCEPT -- IV. THE NAS "BLUE BOOK" -- V. UNDERSTANDING RISK: INFORMING DECISIONS IN A DEMOCRATIC SOCIETY -- A. DECISION-DRIVEN: INFORMING CHOICES, SOLVING PROBLEMS -- B. CONSIDER RELEVANT LOSSES, HARMS, OR CONSEQUENCES -- C. APPLY AN ANALYTIC-DELIBERATIVE PROCESS -- D. STARTWITH PROVISIONAL ASSESSMENT OF THE DECISION -- E. NEED FOR PROBLEM FORMULATION -- F. A MUTUAL AND ITERATIVE PROCESS -- G. DEVELOPING ORGANIZATIONAL CAPABILITY -- VI. FRAMEWORK FOR ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH RISK MANAGEMENT -- A. DEFINING THE PROBLEM -- B. ANALYZING RISKS -- C. EXAMINING OPTIONS -- D. MAKING A DECISION -- E. TAKING ACTION -- F. EVALUATING RESULTS -- VII. USEPA'S REMEDY SELECTION RULES OF THUMB -- A. RISK ASSESSMENT RULES OF THUMB -- 1. Conceptual Site Model -- 2. Exposure Pathways -- 3. Data Needs -- 4. Site-Specific Risk Calculations -- 5. Other Measures of Risk -- 6. Exposed Populations -- 7. Ecological Risk Assessment -- B. RISK MANAGEMENT RULES OF THUMB -- 1. Basis for Action -- 2. Preliminary Remediation Goals-Carcinogens -- 3. Preliminary Remediation Goals-Non-carcinogens -- 4. Chemical-Specific ARARs.

5. Background Concentrations -- 6. Selecting Remedial Action -- 7. Timing -- VIII. ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT GUIDANCE -- IX. COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT -- A. DIALOGUE -- B. PARTNERSHIPS -- C. ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE -- D. STAKEHOLDER INVOLVEMENT -- X. PROBABILISTIC RISK ASSESSMENT -- XI. PERSPECTIVES FROM STATE INITIATIVES AND VOLUNTARY CLEANUP PROGRAMS -- XII. INTERNATIONAL RISK ASSESSMENT PERSPECTIVE -- Appendix B -- I. A FINANCIAL PERSPECTIVE -- II. FINANCING ENVIRONMENTAL RISK MANAGEMENT -- A. CAPITAL EXPENDITURES -- B. OPERATING EXPENSES -- C. RESERVE EXPENDITURES -- D. COMPARISON OF FINANCING TYPES -- III. BUILDING SHAREHOLDER VALUE FROM PROJECT COSTS -- IV. COMPARING AND OPTIMIZING STRATEGIES -- V. EVALUATING A CORPORATE PORTFOLIO -- VI. THE NEED FOR BETTER ANALYSIS -- Appendix C -- I. INTRODUCTION -- II. "THE RULES" -- RULE 1. Once brought into the public eye because of your association with a -- RULE 2. The "facts of life" of Rule 1 lead to the second rule of -- RULE 3. The third rule is the hardest for most engineers and executives to -- III. THE FOUR PRIORITIES OF PUBLIC COMMUNICATION -- A. FOR EACH AUDIENCE, DEFINE THE RISK -- B. DESCRIBE ACTIONS THAT MITIGATE THE RISK -- C. IDENTIFY THE CAUSE OF THE RISK -- D. DEMONSTRATE RESPONSIBLE MANAGEMENT ACTION -- IV. DECISION PRIORITIES -- A. TO WHOM MUST WE COMMUNICATE AND IN WHAT PRIORITY? -- B. WHAT ARE THE KEY POINTS FOR EACH OF THE DIFFERENT PUBLICS? -- C. WHEN DOES THE COMPANY FIRST COMMUNICATE? -- D. WHAT VEHICLE SHOULD BE USED TO COMMUNICATE? -- E. WHO SHOULD DO THE COMMUNICATING? -- F. WHAT IS THE APPROPRIATE LEVEL OF BACKGROUND FOR EACH AUDIENCE? -- G. FROM WHERE DO YOU COMMUNICATE? -- H. ARE AUTHORITIES LIMITING COMMUNICATIONS (EITHER CONTENT, TIMING, SCOPE, OR MEDIA), AND SHOULD THE COMPANY COOPERATE WITH THESE LIMITATIONS?.

I. WHAT IS THE DECISION OR APPROVAL PROCESS FOR STATEMENTS THAT THE COMPANY MAY MAKE? -- V. DEVELOPING A COMMUNICATIONS STRATEGY AND PLAN -- Appendix D -- Table D.1 Risk-Based Analysis: Five Progressive, Knowledge-Building Value Points -- Table D.2 Problem Formulation Background Information Checklist -- Table D.3 Problem Formulation Initial Problem Statement -- Table D.4 Problem Formulation Conceptual Site Model -- Table D.5 Problem Formulation Defining the Decision: Issues Analysis -- Table D.6 Problem Formulation Defining the Decision: Objective Issue Typology -- Table D.7 Problem Formulation Defining the Decision -- Table D.8 Problem Formulation Informing the Decision -- Table D.9 Problem Formulation Planning the Rest of the Process -- Table D.10 Situation Analysis Defining the Decision: Players -- Table D.11 Situation Analysis Defining the Decision: Issues -- Table D.12 Situation Analysis Defining the Decision: Subjective Issue Typology -- Table D.13 Situation Analysis Problem Formulation Update -- Table D.14 Managing the Risk Assessment Rules-of-Thumb for a Baseline Assessment -- Table D.15 Managing the Risk Assessment -- Table D.16 Risk Management Options Rules-of-Thumb -- Table D.17 Integrating Remedial/Corrective Action and Redevelopment Plans -- Table D.18 Risk Arguments -- Appendix E -- I. ACRONYMS -- II. GLOSSARY -- REFERENCES.

Reality-Based Management, Kurt A. Frantzen and Jerry AckermanEnvironmental Risk Management, Kurt A. FrantzenInterfacing the Assessment, Management, and Communication of Risk, Cris Williams, Kurt A. Frantzen, and Judy VangalioThe Practice of Risk-Based Analysis, Kurt A. Frantzen, Cris Williams, Judy Vangalio, and Jerry AckermanAPPENDICESEvolution of the Risk Paradigm, Cris WilliamsEvaluating Financial Liability Implications of Environmental Risks, John RosengardRisk Communication Basics, Sam OstrowRisk-Based Analysis Workbook, Kurt A. Frantzen, Judy Vangalio, and Cris Williams.

Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.