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Religion in Politics : Constitutional and Moral Perspectives.

By: Perry, Michael J.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Cary : Oxford University Press, 2014Copyright date: ©1999Description: 1 online resource (177 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780195351347.Subject(s): Constitutional law -- Moral and ethical aspects -- United States | Electronic books. -- local | Law and ethics | Religion and politics -- United States | Religion and state -- United States | United States -- ReligionGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Religion in Politics : Constitutional and Moral PerspectivesDDC classification: 322.10973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents -- Introduction: Religion in Politics -- One: The Constitutional Law of Religious Freedom -- I. Getting from There to Here -- II. Free Exercise -- III. Nonestablishment -- IV. Why Nonestablishment? -- V. Nonestablishment Conflicts -- VI. Free Exercise, Nonestablishment, and the Problem of "Accommodation" -- VII. Religion in Politics: Constitutional Perspectives -- Appendix: Declaration on the Elimination of All Forms of Intolerance and of Discrimination Based on Religion or Belief -- Two: Religious Arguments in Public Political Debate -- I. Religious Arguments in Public Political Debate-and in Public Culture Generally -- II. Greenawalt on Religious Arguments in Public Political Debate -- III. Rawls's "Ideal of Public Reason" -- Three: Religious Arguments as a Basis of Political Choice -- I. Religious Arguments as a Basis of Political Choice -- II. Religious Arguments about Human Worth -- III. Religious Arguments about Human Well-Being -- IV. A Case in Point: Religious Arguments about the Morality of Homosexual Sexual Conduct -- V. Finnis's Secular Argument about the Morality of Homosexual Sexual Conduct -- VI. A Concluding Comment (Mainly for Theologically "Conservative" Christians) -- Appendix: Judges-A Special Case? -- Notes -- Index -- A -- B -- C -- D -- E -- F -- G -- H -- I -- J -- K -- L -- M -- N -- O -- P -- Q -- R -- S -- T -- U -- V -- W -- Z.
Summary: Written by a leading constitutional theorist, this provocative book examines a number of related, topical questions that linger behind today's headlines and issues--relevant, historic questions that seem to preoccupy the national psyche now more than ever. What role should religious arguments play in public debate about political choices? Or should they play such a role in the first place? Is it right to use religion as a basis for political decision-making? Concerned with such fundamentals as the constitutional premise that the government may not establish religion, this clearly- and thoroughly-written study will interest religious and political thinkers of all sorts, as well as students of current events and constitutional matters.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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BL65.P7 -- P47 1999 (Browse shelf) http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=431189 Available EBC431189

Contents -- Introduction: Religion in Politics -- One: The Constitutional Law of Religious Freedom -- I. Getting from There to Here -- II. Free Exercise -- III. Nonestablishment -- IV. Why Nonestablishment? -- V. Nonestablishment Conflicts -- VI. Free Exercise, Nonestablishment, and the Problem of "Accommodation" -- VII. Religion in Politics: Constitutional Perspectives -- Appendix: Declaration on the Elimination of All Forms of Intolerance and of Discrimination Based on Religion or Belief -- Two: Religious Arguments in Public Political Debate -- I. Religious Arguments in Public Political Debate-and in Public Culture Generally -- II. Greenawalt on Religious Arguments in Public Political Debate -- III. Rawls's "Ideal of Public Reason" -- Three: Religious Arguments as a Basis of Political Choice -- I. Religious Arguments as a Basis of Political Choice -- II. Religious Arguments about Human Worth -- III. Religious Arguments about Human Well-Being -- IV. A Case in Point: Religious Arguments about the Morality of Homosexual Sexual Conduct -- V. Finnis's Secular Argument about the Morality of Homosexual Sexual Conduct -- VI. A Concluding Comment (Mainly for Theologically "Conservative" Christians) -- Appendix: Judges-A Special Case? -- Notes -- Index -- A -- B -- C -- D -- E -- F -- G -- H -- I -- J -- K -- L -- M -- N -- O -- P -- Q -- R -- S -- T -- U -- V -- W -- Z.

Written by a leading constitutional theorist, this provocative book examines a number of related, topical questions that linger behind today's headlines and issues--relevant, historic questions that seem to preoccupy the national psyche now more than ever. What role should religious arguments play in public debate about political choices? Or should they play such a role in the first place? Is it right to use religion as a basis for political decision-making? Concerned with such fundamentals as the constitutional premise that the government may not establish religion, this clearly- and thoroughly-written study will interest religious and political thinkers of all sorts, as well as students of current events and constitutional matters.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Perry (law, Northwestern Univ.) investigates several basic questions prominent in discussions of the relationship between religion and politics in the US, questions that raise both constitutional and moral issues. Not surprisingly, the author's inquiry into the constitutionally permissible role for religion to play in American politics requires him to explain and justify his interpretation of the "establishment" clause. He then extends his discussion to consider such questions as whether anyone violates the nonestablishment clause by appealing to a religious argument to determine a decision about a political matter. Most of the argument hinges on the author's debatable definition of "moral claim" and "religious claim" and the supposed relation between them. The book contains fewer than 100 pages of text; 50 pages of notes serve as a substitute for a bibliography. Upper-division undergraduate; graduate; faculty. R. H. Nash; Reformed Theological Seminary

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Michael J. Perry is the Howard J. Trienens Chair in Law at Northwestern University. Among his numerous writings are The Constitution in the Courts (Oxford, 1994) and Love & Power (Oxford, 1991).

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