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Lending Behavior Toward Family Firms.

By: Pijanowski, Thomas.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Familienunternehmen und KMU Ser: Publisher: Wiesbaden : Gabler, 2014Copyright date: ©2014Edition: 1st ed.Description: 1 online resource (192 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9783658066833.Subject(s): Family-owned business enterprises -- FinanceGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Lending Behavior Toward Family FirmsDDC classification: 657.833 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Dedication -- Foreword -- Acknowledgements -- Table of Contents -- List of Figures -- List of Tables -- List of Abbreviations -- 1 Introduction -- 1.1 Problem Outline and Research Question -- 1.2 Status Quo of Related Research -- 1.3 Purpose and Scope of the Research Project -- 1.4 Research Approach -- 1.5 Structure -- 2 Literature Review -- 2.1 Research Regarding Lending Behavior in General -- 2.1.1 Neoclassical Approach -- 2.1.2 Agency Theory -- 2.1.3 Behavioral Economics -- 2.2 Research Regarding Lending Behavior toward Family Firms -- 2.2.1 Method -- 2.2.2 Theoretical Arguments -- 2.2.3 Empirical Approaches and Results -- 2.2.4 Critique -- 2.2.5 Recommendation for Future Research -- 2.2.6 Limitations of the Literature Review -- 2.3 Other Important Theories within Family Business Research with Relevance to Lending Behavior -- 2.3.1 Socioemotional Wealth -- 2.3.2 Resource-Based View -- 2.4 Interim Conclusion -- 3 Theoretical Model and Hypotheses Development -- 3.1 Theoretical Model -- 3.2 Main Effects -- 3.2.1 Family-Related Decision Attributes -- 3.2.2 Board Function -- 3.2.3 Experience of the CEO -- 3.2.4 Transparency -- 3.2.5 Level of Attestation -- 3.2.6 Independence of Collateral -- 3.3 Moderating Effects -- 3.3.1 Similarity Bias -- 3.3.2 Framing Effect -- 3.3.3 Environmental Context Effect -- 3.4 Interaction Effects -- 3.4.1 Family Influence and the Board Function -- 3.4.2 Family Influence and the CEO's Experience -- 3.4.3 Family Influence and the Level of Transparency -- 3.4.4 Family Influence and the Level of Attestation -- 3.4.5 Family Influence and the Independence of Collateral -- 3.5 Synopsis of the Hypotheses -- 4 Research Methodology -- 4.1 Experimental research in general -- 4.2 Conjoint Analysis as a Research Method -- 4.3 Conjoint Specifications of the Current Study -- 4.3.1 Participants -- 4.3.2 Data Collection Procedure.
4.3.3 Measurement of Loan Officers' Decision Making -- 4.3.4 Decision Attributes -- 4.3.5 Operationalization of the Similarity Effect -- 4.3.6 Operationalization of the Framing and Environmental Context Effect -- 4.3.7 Control Variables -- 4.3.8 Experimental Design -- 4.4 Data Analysis -- 5 Results -- 5.1 Main Effects -- 5.2 Moderating Effects -- 5.3 Interaction Effects -- 5.4 Controls -- 6 Discussion and Conclusion -- 6.1 Discussion and Interpretation of the Main Findings -- 6.2 Contributions to Research -- 6.3 Implications for Family Firms -- 6.4 Implications for Lenders -- 6.5 Limitations of Findings -- 6.6 Recommendations for Future Research -- 6.7 Conclusion -- Appendix -- References.
Summary: Sufficient capital is the basic requirement necessary to operate the business, to fund innovation, to drive growth and to successfully hand over the business to next generations. Thomas Pijanowski investigates the impact of family firms on bank loan officers' judgment and decision making in the context of lending. Using an experimental conjoint approach and building upon behavioral economics he examines the question of whether and why loan officers deal heterogeneously with different types of family firms in the context of their credit availability decisions. The outcome of this research project holds some important implications for practitioners.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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HG1-HG9999 (Browse shelf) http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=1783587 Available EBC1783587

Dedication -- Foreword -- Acknowledgements -- Table of Contents -- List of Figures -- List of Tables -- List of Abbreviations -- 1 Introduction -- 1.1 Problem Outline and Research Question -- 1.2 Status Quo of Related Research -- 1.3 Purpose and Scope of the Research Project -- 1.4 Research Approach -- 1.5 Structure -- 2 Literature Review -- 2.1 Research Regarding Lending Behavior in General -- 2.1.1 Neoclassical Approach -- 2.1.2 Agency Theory -- 2.1.3 Behavioral Economics -- 2.2 Research Regarding Lending Behavior toward Family Firms -- 2.2.1 Method -- 2.2.2 Theoretical Arguments -- 2.2.3 Empirical Approaches and Results -- 2.2.4 Critique -- 2.2.5 Recommendation for Future Research -- 2.2.6 Limitations of the Literature Review -- 2.3 Other Important Theories within Family Business Research with Relevance to Lending Behavior -- 2.3.1 Socioemotional Wealth -- 2.3.2 Resource-Based View -- 2.4 Interim Conclusion -- 3 Theoretical Model and Hypotheses Development -- 3.1 Theoretical Model -- 3.2 Main Effects -- 3.2.1 Family-Related Decision Attributes -- 3.2.2 Board Function -- 3.2.3 Experience of the CEO -- 3.2.4 Transparency -- 3.2.5 Level of Attestation -- 3.2.6 Independence of Collateral -- 3.3 Moderating Effects -- 3.3.1 Similarity Bias -- 3.3.2 Framing Effect -- 3.3.3 Environmental Context Effect -- 3.4 Interaction Effects -- 3.4.1 Family Influence and the Board Function -- 3.4.2 Family Influence and the CEO's Experience -- 3.4.3 Family Influence and the Level of Transparency -- 3.4.4 Family Influence and the Level of Attestation -- 3.4.5 Family Influence and the Independence of Collateral -- 3.5 Synopsis of the Hypotheses -- 4 Research Methodology -- 4.1 Experimental research in general -- 4.2 Conjoint Analysis as a Research Method -- 4.3 Conjoint Specifications of the Current Study -- 4.3.1 Participants -- 4.3.2 Data Collection Procedure.

4.3.3 Measurement of Loan Officers' Decision Making -- 4.3.4 Decision Attributes -- 4.3.5 Operationalization of the Similarity Effect -- 4.3.6 Operationalization of the Framing and Environmental Context Effect -- 4.3.7 Control Variables -- 4.3.8 Experimental Design -- 4.4 Data Analysis -- 5 Results -- 5.1 Main Effects -- 5.2 Moderating Effects -- 5.3 Interaction Effects -- 5.4 Controls -- 6 Discussion and Conclusion -- 6.1 Discussion and Interpretation of the Main Findings -- 6.2 Contributions to Research -- 6.3 Implications for Family Firms -- 6.4 Implications for Lenders -- 6.5 Limitations of Findings -- 6.6 Recommendations for Future Research -- 6.7 Conclusion -- Appendix -- References.

Sufficient capital is the basic requirement necessary to operate the business, to fund innovation, to drive growth and to successfully hand over the business to next generations. Thomas Pijanowski investigates the impact of family firms on bank loan officers' judgment and decision making in the context of lending. Using an experimental conjoint approach and building upon behavioral economics he examines the question of whether and why loan officers deal heterogeneously with different types of family firms in the context of their credit availability decisions. The outcome of this research project holds some important implications for practitioners.

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Author notes provided by Syndetics

Dr. Thomas Pijanowski wrote his dissertation under the supervision of Prof. Dr. Andreas Hack and Prof. Dr. Arist von Schlippe at the Witten Institute for Family Business (WIFU) at Witten/Herdecke University.

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