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Toleration and the Constitution.

By: Richards, David A. J.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Cary : Oxford University Press, 2014Copyright date: ©1986Description: 1 online resource (367 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780195363081.Subject(s): Constitutional law -- United States | Electronic books. -- local | Freedom of religion -- United States | Freedom of speech -- United States | Privacy, Right of -- United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Toleration and the ConstitutionDDC classification: 342.73085 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents -- PART I. INTERPRETATION AND THE CONSTITUTION -- 1. The Aims of Constitutional Theory: A Comparative Analysis -- Court-Skeptical Theory -- Rights-Skeptical Theory -- The Theory of Neutral Principles -- Rights-Based Theory -- The Roles of Political and Moral Theory -- 2. Legal Interpretation and Historiography -- Interpretation and Western Culture -- Legal Interpretation -- Constitutional Interpretation -- 3. Constitutional Interpretation -- Against Positivistic Conventionalism -- A Conventionalist Argument Against Political Theory in Constitutional Interpretation -- History and Contractarian Political Theory in Constitutional Interpretation -- Contractarian Theory and the Inalienable Right to Conscience -- Interpretation and Judicial Review -- PART II. RELIGIOUS LIBERTY -- 4. The Inalienable Right to Conscience -- Covenant and Rights of the Person -- Utilitarian Equality -- Equal Respect for Persons -- Conscience as an Inalienable Human Right -- Contractarian Thought and the Moral Sovereignty of the People -- 5. The Primacy of Religious Toleration -- Historiography of the Religion Clauses -- The Jurisprudence of the Religion Clauses -- PART III. FREE SPEECH -- 6. A Theory of Free Speech -- Conscience and Communicative Integrity -- The Historiography of Free Speech and Press Clauses -- Jurisprudence of Free Speech: Subversive Advocacy -- 7. The Jurisprudence of Free Speech -- Group Libel and Offense in the Public Forum -- Defamation and Privacy -- Obscenity -- Commercial Speech -- The Equalization of Power and Free Speech -- The Public Forum -- Concluding Methodological Remarks -- PART IV. CONSTITUTIONAL PRIVACY -- 8. A Theory of Constitutional Privacy -- The Interpretive Legitimacy of the Right of Constitutional Privacy -- Changing Moral Consensus -- The Harm Principle -- Conscience, Privacy, and General Goods.
Equal Respect and the Religion Clauses -- Primacy of Toleration and Constitutional Privacy -- 9. The Jurisprudence of Constitutional Privacy -- Privacy and Contraception -- Constitutional Privacy and Abortion -- Privacy and Sexual Autonomy -- Beyond Constitutional Privacy -- 10. Methodological Perspectives on Political Theory and Constitutional Interpretation -- Interpreting the Text -- The Scope of Judicial Review -- Review Standards over Federalism and Separation of Powers -- Equal Protection -- Interpretation, Unity of Theory and Practice, and the American Law School -- Bibliography -- Cases -- Statutes -- Index -- A -- B -- C -- D -- E -- F -- G -- H -- I -- J -- K -- L -- M -- N -- O -- P -- Q -- R -- S -- T -- U -- V -- W.
Summary: Current changes in the structure of the Supreme Court, as well as recent Supreme Court decisions affecting individual rights, have today brought constitutional issues to the forefront of American thought. This study, based on an original synthesis of political theory, history, law, and a larger approach to the interpretation of culture, develops a general theory of constitutional interpretation, touching on a myriad of current topics of constitutional controversy, including church-state relations, the scope of free speech, and the application of the constitutional right to privacy, abortion, and consensual adult sexual relations.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
KF4550 -- .R48 1986 (Browse shelf) http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=3052935 Available EBC3052935

Contents -- PART I. INTERPRETATION AND THE CONSTITUTION -- 1. The Aims of Constitutional Theory: A Comparative Analysis -- Court-Skeptical Theory -- Rights-Skeptical Theory -- The Theory of Neutral Principles -- Rights-Based Theory -- The Roles of Political and Moral Theory -- 2. Legal Interpretation and Historiography -- Interpretation and Western Culture -- Legal Interpretation -- Constitutional Interpretation -- 3. Constitutional Interpretation -- Against Positivistic Conventionalism -- A Conventionalist Argument Against Political Theory in Constitutional Interpretation -- History and Contractarian Political Theory in Constitutional Interpretation -- Contractarian Theory and the Inalienable Right to Conscience -- Interpretation and Judicial Review -- PART II. RELIGIOUS LIBERTY -- 4. The Inalienable Right to Conscience -- Covenant and Rights of the Person -- Utilitarian Equality -- Equal Respect for Persons -- Conscience as an Inalienable Human Right -- Contractarian Thought and the Moral Sovereignty of the People -- 5. The Primacy of Religious Toleration -- Historiography of the Religion Clauses -- The Jurisprudence of the Religion Clauses -- PART III. FREE SPEECH -- 6. A Theory of Free Speech -- Conscience and Communicative Integrity -- The Historiography of Free Speech and Press Clauses -- Jurisprudence of Free Speech: Subversive Advocacy -- 7. The Jurisprudence of Free Speech -- Group Libel and Offense in the Public Forum -- Defamation and Privacy -- Obscenity -- Commercial Speech -- The Equalization of Power and Free Speech -- The Public Forum -- Concluding Methodological Remarks -- PART IV. CONSTITUTIONAL PRIVACY -- 8. A Theory of Constitutional Privacy -- The Interpretive Legitimacy of the Right of Constitutional Privacy -- Changing Moral Consensus -- The Harm Principle -- Conscience, Privacy, and General Goods.

Equal Respect and the Religion Clauses -- Primacy of Toleration and Constitutional Privacy -- 9. The Jurisprudence of Constitutional Privacy -- Privacy and Contraception -- Constitutional Privacy and Abortion -- Privacy and Sexual Autonomy -- Beyond Constitutional Privacy -- 10. Methodological Perspectives on Political Theory and Constitutional Interpretation -- Interpreting the Text -- The Scope of Judicial Review -- Review Standards over Federalism and Separation of Powers -- Equal Protection -- Interpretation, Unity of Theory and Practice, and the American Law School -- Bibliography -- Cases -- Statutes -- Index -- A -- B -- C -- D -- E -- F -- G -- H -- I -- J -- K -- L -- M -- N -- O -- P -- Q -- R -- S -- T -- U -- V -- W.

Current changes in the structure of the Supreme Court, as well as recent Supreme Court decisions affecting individual rights, have today brought constitutional issues to the forefront of American thought. This study, based on an original synthesis of political theory, history, law, and a larger approach to the interpretation of culture, develops a general theory of constitutional interpretation, touching on a myriad of current topics of constitutional controversy, including church-state relations, the scope of free speech, and the application of the constitutional right to privacy, abortion, and consensual adult sexual relations.

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CHOICE Review

Recent years have seen the development of a lively literature concerned with problems of constitutional interpretation. This ambitious and well-documented addition to the tradition by Richards (New York University), casts a wide net historically, philosophically, and substantively. It begins with an overview of various theories of constitutional interpretation but rejects as too limiting those that are ``clause-bound'' or grounded on the ``intent of the framers.'' In place of such partial theories Richards proposes a more eclectic ``contractarian'' theory rooted in the primacy of religious toleration and the inalienable right of conscience-ideas developed in John Locke's Letter Concerning Toleration (1689) and James Madison's ``Memorial and Remonstrance.'' This theory is then employed to clarify and critically evaluate evolving judicial doctrine and interpretative doctrine in the areas of religion, free speech, and privacy. In the process Richards makes a convincing case that his contractarian theory is a useful tool for the critical explication of basic constitutional values. Scholars and informed laypersons interested in the current debate on the rights of constitutional privacy will find Richards's discussion of abortion and consensual sexuality challenging and controversial as well as enlightening. Stimulating theoretical, historical, and legal scholarship, suitable for students and general readers.-E.C. Dreyer, University of Tulsa

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