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Gender and American History Since 1890.

By: Melosh, Professor of English Barbara.
Contributor(s): Melosh, Barbara.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Rewriting Histories: Publisher: Florence : Taylor and Francis, 2014Copyright date: ©1993Edition: 1st ed.Description: 1 online resource (317 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780203132906.Subject(s): Sex customs -- United States -- Historiography | Sex role -- United States -- HistoriographyGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Gender and American History Since 1890DDC classification: 305.3097309 LOC classification: HQ1075.5.U6 -- G45 1993Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Front Cover -- Gender and American History Since 1890 -- Copyright Page -- Contents -- List of illustrations -- Editor's preface -- 1. Introduction: Barbara Melosh -- Part I: Sexuality and Gender -- 2. Modern Sexuality and the Myth of Victorian Repression: Christina Simmons -- 3. Sexual Geography and Gender Economy: The furnished room districts of Chicago, 18901930: Joanne Meyerowitz -- 4. Christian Brotherhood or Sexual Perversion? Homosexual identities and the construction of sexual boundaries in the World War I era: George Chauncey, Jr. -- 5. The Meanings of Lesbianism in Postwar America: Donna Penn -- Part II: Work and consumption in visual representations -- 6. Art, the "New Woman," and Consumer culture: Kenneth Hayes Miller and Reginald Marsh on Fourteenth Street, 1920-40: Ellen Wiley Todd -- 7. Manly Work: Public art and masculinity in Depression America: Barbara Melosh -- 8. Gendered Labor: Norman Rockwell's Rosie the Riveter and the discourses of wartime womanhood: Melissa Dabakis -- Part III: Gender as political language -- 9. Civilization, The Decline of Middle-Class Manliness, and IDA B. Wells's Anti-Lynching Campaign (1892-94): Gail Bederman -- 10. Disorderly Women: Gender and labor militancy in the Appalachian South: Jacquelyn Dowd Hall -- 11. Family Violence, Feminism, and social Control: Linda Gordon.
Summary: These essays chart major contributions to recent historiography. Carefully selected for their accessibility and accompanied by headnotes and study questions, the essays offer a clear and engaging introduction for the non-specialist. The introduction describes the emergence of gender as a subject of historical investigation and in ten essays, historians explore the meanings and significance of gender in American history since 1890. The volume shows how the interpretation of gender expands and revises our understanding of significant issues in twentieth-century history, such as work, labour protest, sexuality, consumption and social welfare. It offers new perspectives on visual representations and explores the politics of historical subjects and the politics of our own historical revisions.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HQ1075.5.U6 -- G45 1993 (Browse shelf) http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=178379 Available EBC178379

Front Cover -- Gender and American History Since 1890 -- Copyright Page -- Contents -- List of illustrations -- Editor's preface -- 1. Introduction: Barbara Melosh -- Part I: Sexuality and Gender -- 2. Modern Sexuality and the Myth of Victorian Repression: Christina Simmons -- 3. Sexual Geography and Gender Economy: The furnished room districts of Chicago, 18901930: Joanne Meyerowitz -- 4. Christian Brotherhood or Sexual Perversion? Homosexual identities and the construction of sexual boundaries in the World War I era: George Chauncey, Jr. -- 5. The Meanings of Lesbianism in Postwar America: Donna Penn -- Part II: Work and consumption in visual representations -- 6. Art, the "New Woman," and Consumer culture: Kenneth Hayes Miller and Reginald Marsh on Fourteenth Street, 1920-40: Ellen Wiley Todd -- 7. Manly Work: Public art and masculinity in Depression America: Barbara Melosh -- 8. Gendered Labor: Norman Rockwell's Rosie the Riveter and the discourses of wartime womanhood: Melissa Dabakis -- Part III: Gender as political language -- 9. Civilization, The Decline of Middle-Class Manliness, and IDA B. Wells's Anti-Lynching Campaign (1892-94): Gail Bederman -- 10. Disorderly Women: Gender and labor militancy in the Appalachian South: Jacquelyn Dowd Hall -- 11. Family Violence, Feminism, and social Control: Linda Gordon.

These essays chart major contributions to recent historiography. Carefully selected for their accessibility and accompanied by headnotes and study questions, the essays offer a clear and engaging introduction for the non-specialist. The introduction describes the emergence of gender as a subject of historical investigation and in ten essays, historians explore the meanings and significance of gender in American history since 1890. The volume shows how the interpretation of gender expands and revises our understanding of significant issues in twentieth-century history, such as work, labour protest, sexuality, consumption and social welfare. It offers new perspectives on visual representations and explores the politics of historical subjects and the politics of our own historical revisions.

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