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Gender Trouble Makers : Education and Empowerment in Nepal.

By: Rothchild, Jennifer.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.New Approaches in Sociology: Publisher: Florence : Taylor and Francis, 2014Copyright date: ©2007Description: 1 online resource (215 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780203944301.Subject(s): Girls -- Education -- Nepal | Girls -- Nepal -- Social conditions | Nepal -- Social conditions | Sex discrimination in education -- Nepal | Sex role -- Nepal | Socialization -- NepalGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Gender Trouble Makers : Education and Empowerment in NepalDDC classification: 371.8220955 LOC classification: HQ1075.5.N35 -- R67 2006Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Book Cover -- Title -- Copyright -- Endorsements -- Dedication -- Contents -- List of Tables and Figures -- Acknowledgments -- Chapter One Introduction: Gender and Education -- Chapter Two Setting the Context: Nepal, Jiri, and Education -- Chapter Three Telling the Story: An Overview of the Research Design -- Chapter Four Social Construction of Gender in the Family and Community -- Chapter Five Reinforcing Gender in Schools -- Chapter Six Gender Trouble Makers: Individuals Resisting Gender Constraints -- Chapter Seven Conclusions: Gender, Education, and Empowerment -- Chapter Eight Epilogue: Reflections on the Process -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index.
Summary: International development efforts aimed at improving girls' lives and education have been well-intended, somewhat effective, but ultimately short-sighted and incomplete. This is because international development efforts often operate under a reductive understanding of the term 'gender' and how it influences the lives of girls and boys. Gender is more commonly conceived by international efforts as characteristics which are ascribed to girls as norms for behaviour. In particular, the analysis in Gender Trouble Makers focuses on the social constructions of gender and the ways in which gender was reinforced and maintained through a case study in rural Nepal. In developing countries like Nepal, promoting access to and participation in existing formal education programme is clearly necessary, but it is not, in itself, sufficient to transform gender power relations in the broader society. When gender is properly addressed as a process, then all stakeholders involved - researchers, governmental officials, and community members - can begin to understand and devise more effective ways to increase both girl and boy students' enrollment, participation, and success in school.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HQ1075.5.N35 -- R67 2006 (Browse shelf) http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=292388 Available EBC292388

Book Cover -- Title -- Copyright -- Endorsements -- Dedication -- Contents -- List of Tables and Figures -- Acknowledgments -- Chapter One Introduction: Gender and Education -- Chapter Two Setting the Context: Nepal, Jiri, and Education -- Chapter Three Telling the Story: An Overview of the Research Design -- Chapter Four Social Construction of Gender in the Family and Community -- Chapter Five Reinforcing Gender in Schools -- Chapter Six Gender Trouble Makers: Individuals Resisting Gender Constraints -- Chapter Seven Conclusions: Gender, Education, and Empowerment -- Chapter Eight Epilogue: Reflections on the Process -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index.

International development efforts aimed at improving girls' lives and education have been well-intended, somewhat effective, but ultimately short-sighted and incomplete. This is because international development efforts often operate under a reductive understanding of the term 'gender' and how it influences the lives of girls and boys. Gender is more commonly conceived by international efforts as characteristics which are ascribed to girls as norms for behaviour. In particular, the analysis in Gender Trouble Makers focuses on the social constructions of gender and the ways in which gender was reinforced and maintained through a case study in rural Nepal. In developing countries like Nepal, promoting access to and participation in existing formal education programme is clearly necessary, but it is not, in itself, sufficient to transform gender power relations in the broader society. When gender is properly addressed as a process, then all stakeholders involved - researchers, governmental officials, and community members - can begin to understand and devise more effective ways to increase both girl and boy students' enrollment, participation, and success in school.

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