A History of Police and Masculinities, 1700–2010.

By: Barrie, David GContributor(s): Broomhall, SusanMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandPublisher: Florence : Taylor and Francis, 2012Copyright date: ©2012Description: 1 online resource (321 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781136496646Subject(s): Masculinity | Police -- History | Police -- Social aspectsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: A History of Police and Masculinities, 1700–2010DDC classification: 363.209 LOC classification: HV7903 -- .H57 2012Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Title -- Copyright -- CONTENTS -- List of illustrations -- List of contributors -- Acknowledgements -- Introduction -- 1 The paternal government of men: the self-image and action of the Paris police in the eighteenth century -- 2 'A species of civil soldier': masculinity, policing and the military in 1780s England -- 3 Making men: media, magistrates and the representation of masculinity in Scottish police courts, 1800-35 -- 4 Becoming policemen in nineteenth-century Italy: police gender culture through the lens of professional manuals -- 5 Men on a mission: masculinity, violence and the self-presentation of policemen in England, c. 1870-1914 -- 6 Shedding the uniform and acquiring a new masculine image: the case of the late-Victorian and Edwardian English police detective -- 7 'Well-set-up men': respectable masculinity and police organizational culture in Melbourne 1853-c. 1920 -- 8 Of tabloids, detectives and gentlemen: how depictions of policing helped define American masculinities at the turn of the twentieth century -- 9 Quiet and determined servants and guardians: creating ideal English police officers, 1900-45 -- 10 Science and surveillance: masculinity and the New York State Police, 1945-80 -- 11 Managerial masculinity: an insight into the twenty-first-century police leader -- Bibliography -- Index.
Summary: This unique collection brings together leading international scholars to explore how ideologies about masculinities have shaped police culture, policy and institutional organization from the eighteenth century to the present day. It addresses an under-researched area of historical inquiry, providing the first in-depth study of how gender ideologies have shaped law enforcement and civic governance under 'old' and 'new' police models, tracing links, continuities, and changes between them. The book opens up scholarly understanding of the ways in which policing reflected, sustained, embodied and enforced ideas of masculinities in historic and modern contexts, as well as how conceptions of masculinities were, and continue to be, interpreted through representations of the police in various forms of print and popular culture. The research covers the UK, Europe, Australia and America and explores police typologies in different international and institutional contexts, using varied approaches, sources and interpretive frameworks drawn from historical and criminological traditions. This book will be essential reading for academics, students and those in interested in gender, culture, police and criminal justice history as well as police practitioners.
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Cover -- Title -- Copyright -- CONTENTS -- List of illustrations -- List of contributors -- Acknowledgements -- Introduction -- 1 The paternal government of men: the self-image and action of the Paris police in the eighteenth century -- 2 'A species of civil soldier': masculinity, policing and the military in 1780s England -- 3 Making men: media, magistrates and the representation of masculinity in Scottish police courts, 1800-35 -- 4 Becoming policemen in nineteenth-century Italy: police gender culture through the lens of professional manuals -- 5 Men on a mission: masculinity, violence and the self-presentation of policemen in England, c. 1870-1914 -- 6 Shedding the uniform and acquiring a new masculine image: the case of the late-Victorian and Edwardian English police detective -- 7 'Well-set-up men': respectable masculinity and police organizational culture in Melbourne 1853-c. 1920 -- 8 Of tabloids, detectives and gentlemen: how depictions of policing helped define American masculinities at the turn of the twentieth century -- 9 Quiet and determined servants and guardians: creating ideal English police officers, 1900-45 -- 10 Science and surveillance: masculinity and the New York State Police, 1945-80 -- 11 Managerial masculinity: an insight into the twenty-first-century police leader -- Bibliography -- Index.

This unique collection brings together leading international scholars to explore how ideologies about masculinities have shaped police culture, policy and institutional organization from the eighteenth century to the present day. It addresses an under-researched area of historical inquiry, providing the first in-depth study of how gender ideologies have shaped law enforcement and civic governance under 'old' and 'new' police models, tracing links, continuities, and changes between them. The book opens up scholarly understanding of the ways in which policing reflected, sustained, embodied and enforced ideas of masculinities in historic and modern contexts, as well as how conceptions of masculinities were, and continue to be, interpreted through representations of the police in various forms of print and popular culture. The research covers the UK, Europe, Australia and America and explores police typologies in different international and institutional contexts, using varied approaches, sources and interpretive frameworks drawn from historical and criminological traditions. This book will be essential reading for academics, students and those in interested in gender, culture, police and criminal justice history as well as police practitioners.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This interesting anthology traces changing notions of masculinity in various police agencies in recent history. Although masculinity is the connecting link, the articles are about police authority and its projection, and representations in literature and the press. The contributions cover such topics as the Paris police, Scottish police courts, Italian police in the 19th century, and the New York State police, but more emphasis is on the British police. The police in the past have had to meet changing expectations. They have had to be "hard men" with their fists, domestic missionaries in conveying middle-class notions of public propriety, men who view policing as an almost religious calling, or clever detectives. In the 20th century, masculinity has had to be redefined in the light of women in police forces, with assertions of male control still predominant to this day. The articles could appeal to a broad audience, and each can stand alone as a useful introduction to the subject. The chapters are extensively documented, and the book has a substantial bibliography. For this alone, the work is the best quarry about police sources this reviewer has seen in recent years. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. P. T. Smith emeritus, Saint Joseph's University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

David G. Barrie is lecturer in British history at The University of Western Australia. His research interests include crime and punishment in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Scotland. He is author of Police in the Age of Improvement: Police Development and the Civic Tradition in Scotland, 1775-1865 (Willan Publishing, 2008), which was awarded 'best first book' in Scottish history by the international committee of the Frank Watson Book Prize. He has published widely on Scottish policing in leading international journals.

Susan Broomhall is Winthrop Professor in history at The University of Western Australia. Her research focuses on early modern gender history. Most recently she is editor (with Jaqueline Van Ghent) of Governing Masculinities in the Early Modern Period: Regulating Selves and Others (Ashgate, 2011) and author (with Jennifer Spinks) ofnbsp;Early Modern Women in the Low Countries: Feminising Sources and Interpretations of the Past (Ashgate, 2011).

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