Normal view MARC view ISBD view

African American Intellectual-Activists : Legacies in the Struggle.

By: Sekayi, Dia N.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Studies in African American History and Culture: Publisher: New York : Taylor and Francis, 2013Copyright date: ©2010Description: 1 online resource (129 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781136527289.Subject(s): African American intellectuals -- Biography | African American intellectuals -- Interviews | African Americans -- Civil rights -- History -- 20th century | Black nationalism -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Political activists -- United States -- Biography | Political activists -- United States -- Interviews | Self-perceptionGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: African American Intellectual-Activists : Legacies in the StruggleDDC classification: 307.7640974 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY AND CULTURE -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Table of Contents -- Foreword -- Acknowledgements -- Chapter I: Introduction -- Chapter II: Literature Review -- Chapter III: Methodology -- Chapter IV: Participant Backgrounds -- Chapter V: The Development of a Positive African-American Self Concept -- Chapter VI: Progress Towards Goals of Activism -- Chapter VII: Conclusions -- References -- Index.
Summary: This study examines the narrated life experiences of 11 African American intellectual-activists. An intellectual-activist is defined as a person whose education has provided him or her with a body of knowledge to which he/she is continually adding (intellectual self) and who works daily for, or has a career dedicated to, the betterment of African American people (activist self). The voices of the subjects focus on the events in their lives that contributed to their development as intellectuals and activists. Discussions of the individuals' backgrounds illuminate the forces that influenced their life experiences and guided their actions toward involvement with the struggle to improve the lives of the African American community. The overarching theme in these life stories is the possession of a positive African American self-concept. The study explores the ways in which the subjects developed this positive self-concept, how this self-concept influenced the goals of their activism, and how they define progress toward these goals.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E185.86 -- .S45 1997 (Browse shelf) http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=1122986 Available EBC1122986

Cover -- AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY AND CULTURE -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Table of Contents -- Foreword -- Acknowledgements -- Chapter I: Introduction -- Chapter II: Literature Review -- Chapter III: Methodology -- Chapter IV: Participant Backgrounds -- Chapter V: The Development of a Positive African-American Self Concept -- Chapter VI: Progress Towards Goals of Activism -- Chapter VII: Conclusions -- References -- Index.

This study examines the narrated life experiences of 11 African American intellectual-activists. An intellectual-activist is defined as a person whose education has provided him or her with a body of knowledge to which he/she is continually adding (intellectual self) and who works daily for, or has a career dedicated to, the betterment of African American people (activist self). The voices of the subjects focus on the events in their lives that contributed to their development as intellectuals and activists. Discussions of the individuals' backgrounds illuminate the forces that influenced their life experiences and guided their actions toward involvement with the struggle to improve the lives of the African American community. The overarching theme in these life stories is the possession of a positive African American self-concept. The study explores the ways in which the subjects developed this positive self-concept, how this self-concept influenced the goals of their activism, and how they define progress toward these goals.

Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.