Religion, Identity and Politics : Germany and Turkey in Interaction.

By: Gülalp, HaldunContributor(s): Seufert, GünterMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandStudies in European Sociology: Publisher: Florence : Taylor and Francis, 2013Copyright date: ©2013Description: 1 online resource (216 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781136231674Subject(s): Germany -- Foreign relations -- Turkey | Germany -- Religion | Religion and politics -- Germany | Religion and politics -- Turkey | Turkey -- Foreign relations -- Germany | Turkey -- ReligionGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Religion, Identity and Politics : Germany and Turkey in InteractionDDC classification: 303.482430561 LOC classification: BL65.P7 -- .R43273 2013Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Table of Contents -- Contributors -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction -- 1. The Ottoman Empire, Islam and the emergence of German national identity, 1789-1815 -- Competing views of Islam -- Historical sources of the Romantic view of Islam -- The Quran: from mark of the beast to poetic masterpiece -- Muhammad: from impostor to Romantic hero -- Conclusion -- Notes -- 2. Political religion and autocracy: Wilhelm II's encounter with Ottoman Islam -- Divine guidance and the mysticism of power: the spirit of the Holy Alliance -- Germany: a poly-monarchic country in search of symbolic integration -- A "peaceful crusade": Wilhelm II's voyage to the Ottoman Empire -- Chivalry, piety, and the caliphate -- Protestantism, power, and obedience: the Kaiser and Oriental Christianity -- Conclusion -- Notes -- 3. "Holy war made in Germany"? Ottoman origins of the 1914 jihad -- The multiple meanings of jihad -- Jihad as political weapon? -- The Kaiser's faith in jihad, and Ottoman policy -- Conclusion -- Acknowledgment -- Notes -- 4. "Our new and great cultural missions in the orient": German faith-based and secular missionary activities in the late Ottoman Empire -- Mission and civilizing mission: more than a metaphorical relationship? -- At the origins of mission in the orient: Friedrich Wilhelm IV and the Deaconesses -- The failed crypto-conversion of the Greek-Orthodox Church -- Goltz Pasha and the discovery of Germany's new civilizing mission -- The "Goltz generation" -- From Goltzism to liberal imperialism -- Notes -- 5. Immigrants' struggle for recognition: religion and politics -- A brief overview of the history of immigration in Germany -- The contemporary social position of persons of immigrant origin -- On notions of integration and immigration -- From national identity to religious identity.
Immigrants and politics -- 6. Islam and gender under liberal-secular governance: the German Islam Conference -- The German Islam Conference: education through dialogue -- The role of secular Muslim feminists -- Dialogue as normalization -- Final remarks -- Acknowledgement -- Notes -- 7. Muslim loyalty put to the test: the reception of the cartoon controversy in Germany -- Fundamentalist Islam vs. liberal-democratic Europe -- The racialization of Muslims -- Neither inside nor outside -- Muslims in Germany put to the test -- Conclusion -- Notes -- 8. German anti-discrimination law: accommodating religious pluralism or conserving the cultural heritage? -- Political dynamics of contention -- Controversies about religious discrimination -- The adoption of the new legislation -- Negotiating the Equalities Act -- Conclusion -- Notes -- 9. The legal treatment of religious minorities: non-Muslims in Turkey and Muslims in Germany -- The legal treatment of non-Muslims in Turkey -- The legal treatment of Germany's Muslims -- Conclusion -- Notes -- 10. Religious conversion and national identity: Turkish Christians and German Muslims -- Fear of converts in Germany and Turkey -- The German case -- The Turkish case -- The socio-spatial challenge -- The challenge to the temporal order -- Conclusion -- Acknowledgement -- Notes -- 11. Alevism as a subject of religious instruction in Turkey and Germany -- The coming out of Alevism -- The place of Alevism in the new syllabus for religious instruction -- Alevism in Germany as an outcome of migration -- The integration of non-autochthonous religious communities in Germany -- The Alevis' struggle for recognition in Germany: umbrella organization as Religionsgemeinschaft -- The particularity of the Alevi belief -- Alevi religious instruction in public schools -- Notes.
12. Religion on my mind: secularism, Christianity and European identity -- Secularism and the European Court of Human Rights -- The Turkish model -- Headscarf regulation in Germany -- Western civilization and the crucifix -- Conclusion -- Notes -- References -- Index.
Summary: German-Turkish relations, which have a long history and generally unrecognized depth, have rarely been examined as mutually formative processes. Isolated instances of influence have been examined in detail, but the historical and still ongoing processes of mutual interaction have rarely been seriously considered. The ruling assumption has been that Germany may have an impact on Turkey, but not the other way around. Religion, Identity and Politics examines this mutual interaction, specifically with regard to religious identities and institutions. It opposes the commonly held assumption that Europe is the abode of secularism and enlightenment, while the lands of Islam are the realm of backwardness and fundamentalism. Both historically and contemporarily, Germany has treated religion as a core aspect of communal and civilizational identity and framed its institutions accordingly; the book explores how there has been, and continues to be, a mutual exchange in this regard between Germany and both the Ottoman Empire and modern Turkey. The authors show that the definition of identity and regulation of communities have been explicitly based on religion until the early and since the late twentieth century; the period in between- the age of secular nationalism- which has always been treated as the norm, now appears more clearly as an exception. This book will be of interest to students and scholars of sociology, politics, history and religion.
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Cover -- Half Title -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Table of Contents -- Contributors -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction -- 1. The Ottoman Empire, Islam and the emergence of German national identity, 1789-1815 -- Competing views of Islam -- Historical sources of the Romantic view of Islam -- The Quran: from mark of the beast to poetic masterpiece -- Muhammad: from impostor to Romantic hero -- Conclusion -- Notes -- 2. Political religion and autocracy: Wilhelm II's encounter with Ottoman Islam -- Divine guidance and the mysticism of power: the spirit of the Holy Alliance -- Germany: a poly-monarchic country in search of symbolic integration -- A "peaceful crusade": Wilhelm II's voyage to the Ottoman Empire -- Chivalry, piety, and the caliphate -- Protestantism, power, and obedience: the Kaiser and Oriental Christianity -- Conclusion -- Notes -- 3. "Holy war made in Germany"? Ottoman origins of the 1914 jihad -- The multiple meanings of jihad -- Jihad as political weapon? -- The Kaiser's faith in jihad, and Ottoman policy -- Conclusion -- Acknowledgment -- Notes -- 4. "Our new and great cultural missions in the orient": German faith-based and secular missionary activities in the late Ottoman Empire -- Mission and civilizing mission: more than a metaphorical relationship? -- At the origins of mission in the orient: Friedrich Wilhelm IV and the Deaconesses -- The failed crypto-conversion of the Greek-Orthodox Church -- Goltz Pasha and the discovery of Germany's new civilizing mission -- The "Goltz generation" -- From Goltzism to liberal imperialism -- Notes -- 5. Immigrants' struggle for recognition: religion and politics -- A brief overview of the history of immigration in Germany -- The contemporary social position of persons of immigrant origin -- On notions of integration and immigration -- From national identity to religious identity.

Immigrants and politics -- 6. Islam and gender under liberal-secular governance: the German Islam Conference -- The German Islam Conference: education through dialogue -- The role of secular Muslim feminists -- Dialogue as normalization -- Final remarks -- Acknowledgement -- Notes -- 7. Muslim loyalty put to the test: the reception of the cartoon controversy in Germany -- Fundamentalist Islam vs. liberal-democratic Europe -- The racialization of Muslims -- Neither inside nor outside -- Muslims in Germany put to the test -- Conclusion -- Notes -- 8. German anti-discrimination law: accommodating religious pluralism or conserving the cultural heritage? -- Political dynamics of contention -- Controversies about religious discrimination -- The adoption of the new legislation -- Negotiating the Equalities Act -- Conclusion -- Notes -- 9. The legal treatment of religious minorities: non-Muslims in Turkey and Muslims in Germany -- The legal treatment of non-Muslims in Turkey -- The legal treatment of Germany's Muslims -- Conclusion -- Notes -- 10. Religious conversion and national identity: Turkish Christians and German Muslims -- Fear of converts in Germany and Turkey -- The German case -- The Turkish case -- The socio-spatial challenge -- The challenge to the temporal order -- Conclusion -- Acknowledgement -- Notes -- 11. Alevism as a subject of religious instruction in Turkey and Germany -- The coming out of Alevism -- The place of Alevism in the new syllabus for religious instruction -- Alevism in Germany as an outcome of migration -- The integration of non-autochthonous religious communities in Germany -- The Alevis' struggle for recognition in Germany: umbrella organization as Religionsgemeinschaft -- The particularity of the Alevi belief -- Alevi religious instruction in public schools -- Notes.

12. Religion on my mind: secularism, Christianity and European identity -- Secularism and the European Court of Human Rights -- The Turkish model -- Headscarf regulation in Germany -- Western civilization and the crucifix -- Conclusion -- Notes -- References -- Index.

German-Turkish relations, which have a long history and generally unrecognized depth, have rarely been examined as mutually formative processes. Isolated instances of influence have been examined in detail, but the historical and still ongoing processes of mutual interaction have rarely been seriously considered. The ruling assumption has been that Germany may have an impact on Turkey, but not the other way around. Religion, Identity and Politics examines this mutual interaction, specifically with regard to religious identities and institutions. It opposes the commonly held assumption that Europe is the abode of secularism and enlightenment, while the lands of Islam are the realm of backwardness and fundamentalism. Both historically and contemporarily, Germany has treated religion as a core aspect of communal and civilizational identity and framed its institutions accordingly; the book explores how there has been, and continues to be, a mutual exchange in this regard between Germany and both the Ottoman Empire and modern Turkey. The authors show that the definition of identity and regulation of communities have been explicitly based on religion until the early and since the late twentieth century; the period in between- the age of secular nationalism- which has always been treated as the norm, now appears more clearly as an exception. This book will be of interest to students and scholars of sociology, politics, history and religion.

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Author notes provided by Syndetics

Haldun Gülalp is Professor of Political Science and Director of the Center for Global Studies at Yıldız Technical University, Istanbul, Turkey.

Günter Seufert is a senior researcher with the German Institute for International and Security Affairs (SWP) in Berlin.

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