The architecture of oppression : the SS, forced labor and the Nazi monumental building economy / Paul B. Jaskot.

By: Jaskot, Paul B, 1963-Material type: TextTextSeries: Architext series: Publisher: London ; New York : Routledge, 2000Description: xv, 207 p. : ill., 1 map ; 26 cmISBN: 0415173663; 9780415173667; 0415223415 (pbk.); 9780415223416 (pbk.)Subject(s): Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiter-Partei. Schutzstaffel | National socialism and architecture | Germany -- Politics and government -- 1933-1945 | Forced labor -- Germany | Concentration camps -- Germany | Germany -- Economic policy -- 1933-1945DDC classification: 943.086 LOC classification: DD253.6 | .J37 2000Other classification: 15.70 | 21.62 | ARC 925f | LK 79550 | NQ 2140 | e 191 | k 77 | q 93 | v 43 | v 85
Contents:
Introduction: the Architectural Policy of the SS Interest of the SS in the Monumental Building Economy Development of the SS and the concentration camp system German building economy, 1933-8 SS concentration camps and the formation of DEST DEST and the monumental building economy during the war Productivity and punishment at the DEST stone quarries Party Rally Grounds at Nuremberg: SS Economic Goals and National Socialist Architectural Policy Function of the Party Rally Grounds at Nuremberg Creation of the Zweckverband Reichsparteitag Nurnberg Building at Nuremberg, 1935-9 Building at Nuremberg during the war SS economic goals and the Party Rally Grounds Rebuilding of Berlin: the Interdependence of the GBI and the SS Function of National Socialist building in Berlin Formation of the GBI Redesign of Berlin, 1937-9 Building in Berlin during the war SS economic concerns and Speer's plans for Berlin Soldiers' Hall and KL Flossenburg Political Function of SS Architecture Function of architecture for the SS Building at KL Flossenburg Building at KL Mauthausen
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Includes bibliographical references (p. 183-194) and index.

1 Introduction: the Architectural Policy of the SS 1 -- 2 Interest of the SS in the Monumental Building Economy 11 -- Development of the SS and the concentration camp system 13 -- German building economy, 1933-8 15 -- SS concentration camps and the formation of DEST 19 -- DEST and the monumental building economy during the war 25 -- Productivity and punishment at the DEST stone quarries 34 -- 3 Party Rally Grounds at Nuremberg: SS Economic Goals and National Socialist Architectural Policy 47 -- Function of the Party Rally Grounds at Nuremberg 50 -- Creation of the Zweckverband Reichsparteitag Nurnberg 53 -- Building at Nuremberg, 1935-9 56 -- Building at Nuremberg during the war 61 -- SS economic goals and the Party Rally Grounds 68 -- 4 Rebuilding of Berlin: the Interdependence of the GBI and the SS 80 -- Function of National Socialist building in Berlin 82 -- Formation of the GBI 85 -- Redesign of Berlin, 1937-9 88 -- Building in Berlin during the war 94 -- SS economic concerns and Speer's plans for Berlin 103 -- Soldiers' Hall and KL Flossenburg 108 -- 5 Political Function of SS Architecture 114 -- Function of architecture for the SS 117 -- Building at KL Flossenburg 126 -- Building at KL Mauthausen 132.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Jaskot's innovative and interesting study gives historians new perspectives on the nature of Nazi Germany. Jaskot examines the symbolic meaning and uses of monumental building in the Third Reich. More important, he also connects the Nazis' building program with their wider political and economic goals. Berlin, Nuremberg, and a few other select cities received highest priority in the Nazi monumental construction plans. Jaskot shows how economic and political actors, especially the SS, were able to pursue economic, political, and ideological goals by investing their resources in the quarrying of stone. Camps such as Mauthausen and Flossenb"urg served as centers of stone production for the building industry and punishment for enemies of the state. The book does not lose sight of individuals as it illustrates the complex web that linked architecture, economics, and politics. The author shows how people such as Albert Speer were fully implicated in the deportation of Jews and the use of forced labor while seeking to realize their own and Hitler's architectural dreams. The book is thoroughly footnoted and has a useful bibliography. Upper-division undergraduates and above. W. Smaldone; Willamette University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Paul B. Jaskot is Assistant Professor in the department of Art and Art History at DePaul University in Chicago. His work focuses on the relationship between culture and politics in modern European Art and Architecture.

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