Normal view MARC view ISBD view

And a time for hope : Americans in the Great Depression / James R. McGovern.

By: McGovern, James R.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 2000Description: xii, 354 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0275967867 (alk. paper); 9780275967864 (alk. paper); 0275975444; 9780275975449.Subject(s): United States -- History -- 1933-1945 | United States -- Social life and customs -- 1918-1945 | United States -- Social conditions -- 1933-1945 | National characteristics, AmericanAdditional physical formats: Online version:: And a time for hope.; Online version:: And a time for hope.DDC classification: 973.917 Other classification: 15.85
Contents:
Troubled nation -- President -- New deal -- American scene -- Small worlds -- Sustained rural worlds -- Confirmed African Americans in the cotton -- South -- Seeing tomorrow -- Americans go to the movies -- Americans listen at home -- American workers -- Urban support -- Appeal of the great cities -- Conclusion -- Bibliography -- Index.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E806 .M45 2000 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001479880

Includes bibliographical references (p. [339]-343) and index.

Troubled nation -- President -- New deal -- American scene -- Small worlds -- Sustained rural worlds -- Confirmed African Americans in the cotton -- South -- Seeing tomorrow -- Americans go to the movies -- Americans listen at home -- American workers -- Urban support -- Appeal of the great cities -- Conclusion -- Bibliography -- Index.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

McGovern's book has a persistent and straightforward theme, i.e., contrary to the negativism and sense of crisis that dominates most historical accounts of the Great Depression, traditional American optimism and confidence survived the 1930s remarkably intact, even among the most disadvantaged groups in US society, including African Americans, the "Okies" who migrated to California, and the urban working class. In trying to understand how Americans could maintain their optimism in what is usually seen as such troubling times, McGovern examines the positive aspects of the 1930s. FDR's personality and political acumen were part of the story, but equally important were the influence of movies and radio, the appeal of the "great cities" like New York and Chicago, and pervasive examples of technological progress, including Hoover Dam, the Empire State Building, the growth of electricity, and commercial aviation. Americans' life expectancy actually increased rather dramatically during the 1930s. Although A Time for Hope has a somewhat traditional and old-fashioned feel, it provides a solid and accessible overview of US society in the 1930s, and convincingly makes a significant and counterintuitive point that the Depression years were not always perceived as "depressing." All levels. K. Blaser; Wayne State College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

James R. McGovern is Emeritus Professor of History at the University of West Florida.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.