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Double victory : a multicultural history of America in World War II / Ronald Takaki.

By: Takaki, Ronald T, 1939-2009.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Boston : Little, Brown and Co., c2000Edition: 1st ed.Description: vi, 282 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0316831557; 9780316831550.Subject(s): World War, 1939-1945 -- United States | Racism -- United States | United States -- Race relationsDDC classification: 940.53/73 Other classification: 15.85
Contents:
Introduction: a different memory -- A declaration of war: "double victory" -- "Bomb the color line": the war against Jim Crow -- The original Americans: from battlefields to ceremonies -- A dream of El Norte: crossing the tracks -- Diversity and its discontents: who is an American? -- Remembering Pearl Harbor: from internment to Hiroshima -- Struggling for a world of "no race prejudice": Jewish Americans and the holocaust -- A multicultural "manifest destiny": we are "not a narrow tribe."
Review: "Until now, the story of America's role in World War II has been presented primarily through the lives of powerful policymakers and generals, or through the heroism of American soldiers of predominantly European ancestry. Historian Ronald Takaki's multicultural history offers a different perspective. In Double Victory, history is told through the lives of ordinary, ethnically diverse Americans - a Tuskegee pilot wanting to fly and fight for freedom, a Navajo code talker using his native language to transmit battle messages, a Mexican-American woman riveting B-29 bombers in an airplane factory, a Japanese American feeling betrayed by his own government, and a Jewish-American soldier at Buchenwald pressing human ashes into his palm so that he would never forget what he had seen." "What emerges from Takaki's study is the affirming story of how minorities fought for a "double victory" against fascism abroad and prejudice at home."--BOOK JACKET.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
D769 .T42 2000 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001479955

Includes bibliographical references (p. 237-269) and index.

Introduction: a different memory -- A declaration of war: "double victory" -- "Bomb the color line": the war against Jim Crow -- The original Americans: from battlefields to ceremonies -- A dream of El Norte: crossing the tracks -- Diversity and its discontents: who is an American? -- Remembering Pearl Harbor: from internment to Hiroshima -- Struggling for a world of "no race prejudice": Jewish Americans and the holocaust -- A multicultural "manifest destiny": we are "not a narrow tribe."

"Until now, the story of America's role in World War II has been presented primarily through the lives of powerful policymakers and generals, or through the heroism of American soldiers of predominantly European ancestry. Historian Ronald Takaki's multicultural history offers a different perspective. In Double Victory, history is told through the lives of ordinary, ethnically diverse Americans - a Tuskegee pilot wanting to fly and fight for freedom, a Navajo code talker using his native language to transmit battle messages, a Mexican-American woman riveting B-29 bombers in an airplane factory, a Japanese American feeling betrayed by his own government, and a Jewish-American soldier at Buchenwald pressing human ashes into his palm so that he would never forget what he had seen." "What emerges from Takaki's study is the affirming story of how minorities fought for a "double victory" against fascism abroad and prejudice at home."--BOOK JACKET.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

America's involvement in World War II highlighted the incongruities of U.S. policy toward its minorities. While America battled Hitler to end his "Final Solution," it arrested, denied citizenship to, and persecuted Native Americans, Koreans, Jews, blacks, and Japanese Americans, some of whom were interned in concentration camps such as Manzanar. These people fought a double war--against the Axis powers and American prejudice. Facing discrimination, they still volunteered for combat, worked in munitions factories, and supported the war effort in countless ways. The postwar era saw major changes in the treatment of minorities, giving birth to social revolutions such as the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s. Takaki (ethnic studies, Univ. of California, Berkeley; A Different Mirror: A History of Multicultural America) recounts the war from the minority point of view, detailing how it affected racial policy after the war. The result could have been a dry academic treatise, but Takaki uses countless personal stories (often of one minority person whose prejudiced view of another minority was dispelled after being thrown together with that group) to create a vivid and very readable text. An important book that belongs in both academic and public libraries.--Grant A. Fredericksen, Illinois Prairie Dist. P.L., Metamora (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

The publisher claims that Takaki, by presenting a view of WW II as seen through the eyes of ordinary, diverse Americans, has broken new ground. This is nonsense. The literature of WW II contains a plethora of accounts about the role of women, African Americans, Native Americans, and other "ordinary" Americans. Takaki argues that the war presented a contradiction in that while this country allegedly fought for the preservation of the Four Freedoms, it denied those same freedoms to women and minorities at home and in the military. This, too, is hardly a novel argument. He further asserts that the WW II experience provided the stimulus for the civil rights and women's movements after the war when these same groups insisted that this country live up to the principles for which the conflict was fought. Once more, this argument only confirms what many other studies assert. Takaki's book is based almost entirely on secondary sources, and it has no bibliography. It contains endnotes and photographs. Accessible to general readers and undergraduates, but other, more scholarly accounts, both monographs and general works, do a much better job of presenting the "good war" from the perspectives of minorities and women. R. E. Marcello; University of North Texas

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Ronald Takaki is a Fellow of the Society of American Historians & a professor of Ethnic Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. His books include "Strangers from a Different Shore" & "A Different Mirror" &, most recently, "A Larger Memory". <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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