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All this hell : U.S. nurses imprisoned by the Japanese / Evelyn M. Monahan and Rosemary Neidel-Greenlee.

By: Monahan, Evelyn.
Contributor(s): Neidel-Greenlee, Rosemary, 1941-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Lexington, Ky. : University Press of Kentucky, c2000Description: xi, 228 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0813121485 (alk. paper); 9780813121482 (alk. paper); 0813190614 (pbk); 9780813190617 (pbk).Subject(s): World War, 1939-1945 -- Prisoners and prisons, Japanese | Nurses -- United States -- History -- 20th century | World War, 1939-1945 -- Medical care -- United States | Prisoners of war -- Philippines -- History -- 20th century | Prisoners of war -- Japan -- History -- 20th centuryAdditional physical formats: Online version:: All this hell.DDC classification: 940.54/7252/09599
Contents:
Pacific paradise -- Paradise lost -- Descent into hell -- Other ammo -- From the frying pan into the fire -- Tunnel and the rock -- City of hell -- Life along the River Styx -- Hunger in the heart of hell -- Liberation -- Home at last -- Tribute to Major Maude C. Davison, ANC -- Pre-World War II duty stations of U.S. Navy nurses held as POWs by the Japanese -- Military nurses who were not reassigned following the Japanese attack on the Philippines -- Evacuation of U.S. military nurses from Manila, December 1941 -- Evacuees from the Philippines to Australia -- POW Army nurses personal statistics -- Military grades during World War II --
Review: "More than one hundred U.S. Army and Navy nurses were stationed in Guam and the Philippines at the beginning of World War II. After the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941, five navy nurses on Guam became the first American military women of World War II to be taken prisoner by the Japanese. More than seventy army nurses survived five months of combat conditions in the jungles of Bataan and Corregidor before being captured, only to endure more than three years in prison camps. In all, nearly one hundred nurses became POWs." "This account of the nurses' imprisonment adds a vital chapter to the history of American personnel in the Pacific theater." "When freedom came, the U.S. military ordered the nurses to sign agreements with the government not to discuss their horrific experiences. Evelyn Monahan and Rosemary Neidel-Greenlee have conducted numerous interviews with survivors and scoured archives for letters, diaries, and journals to uncover the heroism and sacrifices of these brave women."--BOOK JACKET.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
D805.P6 A433 2000 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001480151

Includes bibliographical references (p. [210]-216) and index.

Preface -- Pacific paradise -- Paradise lost -- Descent into hell -- The Other ammo -- From the frying pan into the fire -- The Tunnel and the rock -- The City of hell -- Life along the River Styx -- Hunger in the heart of hell -- Liberation -- Home at last -- Appendix A Tribute to Major Maude C. Davison, ANC -- Appendix B Pre-World War II duty stations of U.S. Navy nurses held as POWs by the Japanese -- Appendix C Military nurses who were not reassigned following the Japanese attack on the Philippines -- Appendix D Evacuation of U.S. military nurses from Manila, December 1941 -- Appendix E Evacuees from the Philippines to Australia -- Appendix F POW Army nurses personal statistics -- Appendix H Military grades during World War II -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index.

"More than one hundred U.S. Army and Navy nurses were stationed in Guam and the Philippines at the beginning of World War II. After the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941, five navy nurses on Guam became the first American military women of World War II to be taken prisoner by the Japanese. More than seventy army nurses survived five months of combat conditions in the jungles of Bataan and Corregidor before being captured, only to endure more than three years in prison camps. In all, nearly one hundred nurses became POWs." "This account of the nurses' imprisonment adds a vital chapter to the history of American personnel in the Pacific theater." "When freedom came, the U.S. military ordered the nurses to sign agreements with the government not to discuss their horrific experiences. Evelyn Monahan and Rosemary Neidel-Greenlee have conducted numerous interviews with survivors and scoured archives for letters, diaries, and journals to uncover the heroism and sacrifices of these brave women."--BOOK JACKET.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Some of the least known but most interesting World War II narratives involve the experiences of civilian and military American women living in the South Pacific during the Japanese occupation--the subject of the present volumes. All This Hell describes the plight of 84 female nurses stationed in the South Pacific prior to the war whose lives went from idyllic to horrific when they were interned by the Japanese. Based upon both oral histories and published biographical and autobiographical accounts, the book provides a readable and gripping introduction to the topic for all readers. Its authors, veteran military medical personnel, have also written Albanian Escape, which deals with wartime nursing during World War II. Prisoners in Paradise is a broader, more analytic study. Kaminski (history, Univ. of Wisconsin-Stevens Point) explores the wartime activities of the region's thousands of non-native civilian and military women. Going beyond a narrative of their trials, she considers how attitudes toward gender roles shifted and adapted as women struggled to survive and protect their families. Based upon an extensive list of primary and secondary sources, this book is useful not only in its coverage of this neglected period but also as a more general study of gender in wartime. While All This Hell is recommended for all public and larger academic libraries, Prisoners in Paradise is most appropriate for academic and larger public libraries.--Theresa McDevitt, Indiana Univ., PA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Evelyn M. Monahan served as a U.S. Army medic during the Vietnam era and is a retired psychologist <br> Rosemary Neldel-Creenlee served in the Navy Nurse Corps during the Vietnam era and has held a number of clinical and administrative posts within the Department of Veterans Affairs

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