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Sharing secrets : nineteenth-century women's relations in the short story / Christine Palumbo-DeSimone.

By: Palumbo-DeSimone, Christine, 1964-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Madison [N.J.] : Cranbury, NJ Fairleigh Dickinson University Press ; [distributed by] Associated University Presses, c2000Description: 176 p. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0838638406 (alk. paper); 9780838638408 (alk. paper).Subject(s): Short stories, American -- History and criticism | American fiction -- Women authors -- History and criticism | Women and literature -- English-speaking countries -- History -- 19th century | American fiction -- 19th century -- History and criticism | English fiction -- Women authors -- History and criticism | English fiction -- 19th century -- History and criticism | Short stories, English -- History and criticism | Female friendship in literatureAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Sharing secrets.DDC classification: 813/.0109352042 LOC classification: PS374.W6 | P35 2000Also issued online.
Contents:
1. "Bold, frank, and truthful": "Great books," encoded meanings and nineteenth-century women's short stories -- 2. "Family secrets": the mother-daughter relationship in women's short stories -- 3. "In the privacy of our own society": writing female friendship as story -- 4. Picking up "other women's destinies": nineteenth-century women's community stories.
Review: "In this book, Palumbo-DeSimone considers the place of American women's short fiction in nineteenth-century literary and popular culture. Resisting the narrow focus on content prevalent in feminist criticism, the book instead explores the long-overlooked role of short-story structure in women's popular fiction." "The study reveals how the female world ultimately defined what constituted a "story" for nineteenth-century women, and presents a way for today's reader to approach these sometimes puzzling works of short fiction."--BOOK JACKET.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
PS374.W6 P35 2000 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001479823

Includes bibliographical references (p. 167-173) and index.

Also issued online.

1. "Bold, frank, and truthful": "Great books," encoded meanings and nineteenth-century women's short stories -- 2. "Family secrets": the mother-daughter relationship in women's short stories -- 3. "In the privacy of our own society": writing female friendship as story -- 4. Picking up "other women's destinies": nineteenth-century women's community stories.

"In this book, Palumbo-DeSimone considers the place of American women's short fiction in nineteenth-century literary and popular culture. Resisting the narrow focus on content prevalent in feminist criticism, the book instead explores the long-overlooked role of short-story structure in women's popular fiction." "The study reveals how the female world ultimately defined what constituted a "story" for nineteenth-century women, and presents a way for today's reader to approach these sometimes puzzling works of short fiction."--BOOK JACKET.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Palumbo-DeSimone (Temple Univ.) begins her highly engaging study by posing a question: Why are so many women's stories framed around seemingly meaningless incidents?--a charge often levied against the fiction of 19th-century US women writers by critics who complain that "nothing important" transpires in their works. The author seeks to "show that many overtly 'simple' nineteenth-century women's tales actually are just as richly detailed, deeply meaningful, and artistically intricate as are many of the time-honored pieces of the nineteenth-century." She succeeds admirably, both by examining the story as a gendered structure and by providing readers with tools for undertaking a close reading of the texts. Though some might be disappointed by her focus on the works of white, middle-class, US-born writers, the author defends her selection by explaining that "the encoding devices in short fiction are not simply gender-inflected but frequently race- and class-inflected as well," thereby necessitating a smaller sampling. This study promises to become as important a resource in US literary studies as Elizabeth Ammons's Conflicting Stories (CH, Nov'91), Ann Shapiro's Unlikely Heroines (CH, Sep'87), and The (Other) American Traditions, ed. by Joyce Warren (CH, Oct'93). Very highly recommended for upper-division undergraduates and above. ; SUNY College at Cortland

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