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Spies and commandos : how America lost the secret war in North Vietnam / Kenneth Conboy and Dale Andradé.

By: Conboy, Kenneth J.
Contributor(s): Andradé, Dale.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Modern war studies: Publisher: Lawrence, KS : University Press of Kansas, c2000Description: x, 347 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0700610022 (cloth : alk. paper); 9780700610020 (cloth : alk. paper); 9780700611478 (pbk.); 0700611479 (pbk.).Subject(s): Vietnam War, 1961-1975 -- Military intelligence -- United States | Vietnam War, 1961-1975 -- Commando operations -- Vietnam (Democratic Republic)Additional physical formats: Online version:: Spies and commandos.DDC classification: 959.704/38 Other classification: 15.75
Contents:
Trojan Horses -- Singletons -- Airborne Agents -- Second Wind -- Vulcan -- Bang and Burn -- Nasty Boats -- Sacred Sword Patriot's League -- Switchback -- New Management -- Sea Commandos -- Tonkin Gulf -- Maritime Options -- Frustration Syndrome -- Premonitions -- Suspicious Minds -- Strata -- Red Dragon -- Short-Term Targets -- Denouement -- Guerrillas in Their Midst -- Urgency -- Closing the Gate -- Backdoor -- Exceptions to the Rule -- The Quiet One -- Last Missions -- Defeat.
Summary: "During the Vietnamese war, the United States sought to undermine Hanoi's subversion of the Saigon regime by sending Vietnamese operatives behind enemy line. A secret to most Americans, this covert operation was far from secret in Hanoi; all of the commandos were killed or captured, and many were turned by the Communitsts to report false information. [This book] traces the rise and demise of this secret operation started by the CIA in 1960 and expanded by the Pentagon beginning in 1964". -- Jacket.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
DS559.8.M44 C66 2000 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001479930

Includes bibliographical references and index.

"During the Vietnamese war, the United States sought to undermine Hanoi's subversion of the Saigon regime by sending Vietnamese operatives behind enemy line. A secret to most Americans, this covert operation was far from secret in Hanoi; all of the commandos were killed or captured, and many were turned by the Communitsts to report false information. [This book] traces the rise and demise of this secret operation started by the CIA in 1960 and expanded by the Pentagon beginning in 1964". -- Jacket.

Trojan Horses -- Singletons -- Airborne Agents -- Second Wind -- Vulcan -- Bang and Burn -- Nasty Boats -- Sacred Sword Patriot's League -- Switchback -- New Management -- Sea Commandos -- Tonkin Gulf -- Maritime Options -- Frustration Syndrome -- Premonitions -- Suspicious Minds -- Strata -- Red Dragon -- Short-Term Targets -- Denouement -- Guerrillas in Their Midst -- Urgency -- Closing the Gate -- Backdoor -- Exceptions to the Rule -- The Quiet One -- Last Missions -- Defeat.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Out of the troubled history of the Vietnam War comes this well-researched and detailed study of the doomed, covert U.S. war against North Vietnam. Sponsored by the CIA and the Pentagon from 1960 to 1973, the enthusiastic American program of clandestine commando operations inside North Vietnam was a dismal failure with no appreciable impact on the war--except that it cost hundreds of lives and millions of dollars. Plagued by ignorance, poor training, worse planning, treachery, and bad luck, the U.S. effort to introduce agents behind enemy lines (to foment resistance, spread propaganda, and conduct sabotage, raids, assassinations, and intelligence collection) was a Three Stooges exercise of laughable and tragic proportion. Conboy and Andrad‚, both credible historians of the war in Southeast Asia, have produced a dry but compelling story of good intentions defeated by na‹vet‚ and a vigilant enemy. Sadly, all the spies and commandos they track were either killed or captured. Most revealing is the involvement of the Taiwanese in this secret program. Recommended for all public libraries.--Col. William D. Bushnell, USMC (ret.), Harpswell, ME (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Very few scholarly accounts have been written about espionage during the Vietnam War. Conboy and Andrade have partially filled this void. In this excellent work they have chronicled the unsuccessful attempts by the US to undermine North Vietnam from within. From the start, American efforts to penetrate North Vietnamese society were thwarted by an efficient and resourceful opponent. The authors relate a fascinating story concerning a "singleton," or a group sent into North Vietnam to spy and commit acts of sabotage. Codenamed Remus, it had been discovered in 1962, but North Vietnamese skill stealthily "turned" it into a counterespionage group. The US did not discover this deception until 1968, after years of furnishing supplies to the group. The North Vietnamese, Conboy and Andrade assert, would often commit acts of sabotage on themselves to promote the idea that a group was operable, but foiled other attempts to penetrate their security net. The authors also break new ground concerning the Gulf of Tonkin affair, placing the clandestine war at center stage. They claim that American efforts help "precipitate" a larger war in 1964. A superb work. All levels. D. R. Turner; Davis and Elkins College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Dale Andrade is a historian at the U.S. Army Center of Military History.

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