Ben Tillman & the reconstruction of white supremacy / Stephen Kantrowitz.

By: Kantrowitz, Stephen David, 1965-Material type: TextTextSeries: Fred W. Morrison series in Southern studies: Publisher: Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2000Description: 422 p. : ill. ; 25 cmISBN: 0807825301 (cloth : alk. paper); 9780807825303 (cloth : alk. paper); 0807848395 (pbk. : alk. paper); 9780807848395 (pbk. : alk. paper)Other title: Ben Tillman and the reconstruction of white supremacySubject(s): Tillman, Benjamin R. (Benjamin Ryan), 1847-1918 | Legislators -- United States -- Biography | United States. Congress. Senate -- Biography | White supremacy movements -- Southern States -- History | Men, White -- Political activity -- Southern States -- History | Reconstruction (U.S. history, 1865-1877) | Political culture -- Southern States | Southern States -- Race relations | South Carolina -- Politics and government -- 1865-1950Additional physical formats: Online version:: Ben Tillman & the reconstruction of white supremacy.DDC classification: 975.7/041/092 | B LOC classification: E664.T57 | K36 2000Other classification: 15.85 | NP 6020
Contents:
Introduction: Ben Tillman, agrarian rebel -- Mastery and its discontents -- Planters and the "gentlemen from Africa" -- The shotgun wedding of white supremacy and reform -- Farmers, dudes, white negroes, and the sun-browned goddess -- The mob and the state -- Every white man who is worthy of a vote -- The uses of a pitchfork -- Demagogues and disordered households -- Epilogue: The reconstruction of American democracy.
Summary: "This book traces the history of white male supremacy and its discontents from the era of plantation slavery to the age of Jim Crow. Friend and foe alike and generations of historians interpreted Tillman's physical and rhetorical violence in defense of white supremacy as a matter of racial and gender instinct. This book reveals that Tillman's white supremacy was a political program and social argument whose legacies continue to shape American life."--P. [4] of cover.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E664.T57 K36 2000 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001480383

Includes bibliographical references (p. [367]-396) and index.

"This book traces the history of white male supremacy and its discontents from the era of plantation slavery to the age of Jim Crow. Friend and foe alike and generations of historians interpreted Tillman's physical and rhetorical violence in defense of white supremacy as a matter of racial and gender instinct. This book reveals that Tillman's white supremacy was a political program and social argument whose legacies continue to shape American life."--P. [4] of cover.

Introduction: Ben Tillman, agrarian rebel -- Mastery and its discontents -- Planters and the "gentlemen from Africa" -- The shotgun wedding of white supremacy and reform -- Farmers, dudes, white negroes, and the sun-browned goddess -- The mob and the state -- Every white man who is worthy of a vote -- The uses of a pitchfork -- Demagogues and disordered households -- Epilogue: The reconstruction of American democracy.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Although Kantrowitz agrees with several conclusions reached by Francis B. Simkins in his Pitchfork Ben Tillman, South Carolinian (1944), he moves beyond this work. Kantrowitz more effectively analyzes the redemption of South Carolina from Republican control in the bloody election of 1876. When the Redeemers failed to satisfy the needs of upcountry farmers, Democrats, including Tillman, rejected a Greenback-Republican fusion and won the 1882 election with the race issue. Tillman was wedded to a belief in white supremacy, which he used to rebel against the low-country planters and merchants. Later he successfully convinced the country to accept white supremacy, but his distrust of national political power prevented his support for Populist or Progressive solutions. Furthermore, Tillman was no believer in democracy. He not only led the fight to disfranchise blacks, but also rejected the vote for women. In fact, he privately said that most whites were not worthy of the ballot. As for women, he argued that politics was a masculine activity and would cause women to be unrespectable. Finally the author stresses that Tillman was not a common man of his time and that most of the state's aristocracy agreed on the use of violence to keep blacks down. All levels. ; Concordia University

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