Reading Public Romanticism.

By: Magnuson, PaulMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandPrinceton Legacy Library: Publisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, 2014Copyright date: ©2014Description: 1 online resource (231 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781400864799Subject(s): Authors and readers -- Great Britain -- History -- 19th century | English poetry -- 18th century -- History and criticism | English poetry -- 19th century -- History and criticism | Literary form -- History -- 18th century | Literature and society -- Great Britain -- History -- 19th century | Public opinion -- Great Britain -- History -- 18th century | Public opinion -- Great Britain -- History -- 19th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Reading Public RomanticismDDC classification: 821/.709145 LOC classification: PR590 -- .M22 1998Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Contents.
Summary: Reading Public Romanticism is a significant new example of the linking of esthetics and historical criticism. Here Paul Magnuson locates Romantic poetry within a public discourse that combines politics and esthetics, nationalism and domesticity, sexuality and morality, law and legitimacy. Building on his well-regarded previous work, Magnuson practices a methodology of close historical reading by identifying precise versions of poems, reading their rhetoric of allusion and quotation in the contexts of their original publication, and describing their public genres, such as the letter. He studies the author's public signature or motto, the forms and significance of address used in poems, and the resonances of poetic language and tropes in the public debates. According to Magnuson, "reading locations" means reading the writing that surrounds a poem, the "paratext" or "frame" of the esthetic boundary. In their particular locations in the public discourse, romantic poems are illocutionary speech acts that take a stand on public issues and legitimate their authors both as public characters and as writers. He traces the public significance of canonical poems commonly considered as lyrics with little explicit social or political commentary, including Wordsworth's "Immortality Ode"; Coleridge's "This Lime-Tree Bower My Prison," "Frost at Midnight," and "The Ancient Mariner"; and Keats's "On a Grecian Urn." He also positions Byron's Dedication to Don Juan in the debates over Southey's laureateship and claims for poetic authority and legitimacy. Reading Public Romanticism is a thoughtful and revealing work. Originally published in 1998. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the originalSummary: texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.
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Cover -- Contents.

Reading Public Romanticism is a significant new example of the linking of esthetics and historical criticism. Here Paul Magnuson locates Romantic poetry within a public discourse that combines politics and esthetics, nationalism and domesticity, sexuality and morality, law and legitimacy. Building on his well-regarded previous work, Magnuson practices a methodology of close historical reading by identifying precise versions of poems, reading their rhetoric of allusion and quotation in the contexts of their original publication, and describing their public genres, such as the letter. He studies the author's public signature or motto, the forms and significance of address used in poems, and the resonances of poetic language and tropes in the public debates. According to Magnuson, "reading locations" means reading the writing that surrounds a poem, the "paratext" or "frame" of the esthetic boundary. In their particular locations in the public discourse, romantic poems are illocutionary speech acts that take a stand on public issues and legitimate their authors both as public characters and as writers. He traces the public significance of canonical poems commonly considered as lyrics with little explicit social or political commentary, including Wordsworth's "Immortality Ode"; Coleridge's "This Lime-Tree Bower My Prison," "Frost at Midnight," and "The Ancient Mariner"; and Keats's "On a Grecian Urn." He also positions Byron's Dedication to Don Juan in the debates over Southey's laureateship and claims for poetic authority and legitimacy. Reading Public Romanticism is a thoughtful and revealing work. Originally published in 1998. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original

texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

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CHOICE Review

Magnuson (NYU) addresses the political contexts of Romantic poetry but does not merely echo Carl Woodring's Politics in English Romantic Poetry (CH, May'91). In his cogent introduction and first two chapters, the author proposes a method of reading that mediates the gap between text and context. Central to this method is attention to "the public discourse"--i.e., the complex network of allusion and innuendo that extends through letters, reviews, lectures, parodies, and the poetry itself--and to "the paratext" (both the publication in which a specific instance of a text appears and the subtle qualities that define location: titles, subtitles, prefaces, and the texts that precede and follow). Magnuson then untangles the public discourse and paratext surrounding the first publication of Coleridge's "Frost at Midnight" and "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner," Wordsworth and Coleridge's Lyrical Ballads, Byron's Dedication of Don Juan, and Keats's "Ode on a Grecian Urn." The complex theoretical opening is best suited to graduate students and faculty; the clear, fresh readings will delight students at all levels. A. E. McKim; St. Thomas University

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