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Stevens and the Interpersonal.

By: Halliday, Mark.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Princeton Legacy Library: Publisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, 2014Copyright date: ©2014Description: 1 online resource (205 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781400862245.Subject(s): Interpersonal relations in literature | Stevens, Wallace, -- 1879-1955 -- Criticism and interpretationGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Stevens and the InterpersonalDDC classification: 811/.52 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Contents.
Summary: With Wallace Stevens emerging as a father figure for American poetry of the late twentieth century, Mark Halliday argues that it is time for this "poet of ideas" to undergo an ethical critique. In this bold, accessible reconsideration of Stevens' work, he insists on the importance of interpersonal relations in any account of human life in the modern world. Although Stevens outwardly denies aspects of life that center on such relations as those between friends, lovers, family members, and political constituents, Halliday uncovers in his poetry an anxious awareness of the importance of these relations. Here we see the difficulties Stevens made for himself in wanting to offer a thoroughly satisfying version of secular spiritual health in the modern world without facing up to the moral and psychological implications of his own interpersonal needs, problems, and responsibilities. The final chapter reveals, however, an unusually encouraging "avuncular" attitude toward the reader of the poetry, which may be felt to redeem Stevens from the alienation observed earlier. Halliday develops his views by way of comparisons between Stevens and other poets, especially Thomas Hardy, Emily Dickinson, Robert Frost, and John Ashbery. Originally published in 1991. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PS3537.T4753 -- Z655 1991 (Browse shelf) http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=1700351 Available EBC1700351

Cover -- Contents.

With Wallace Stevens emerging as a father figure for American poetry of the late twentieth century, Mark Halliday argues that it is time for this "poet of ideas" to undergo an ethical critique. In this bold, accessible reconsideration of Stevens' work, he insists on the importance of interpersonal relations in any account of human life in the modern world. Although Stevens outwardly denies aspects of life that center on such relations as those between friends, lovers, family members, and political constituents, Halliday uncovers in his poetry an anxious awareness of the importance of these relations. Here we see the difficulties Stevens made for himself in wanting to offer a thoroughly satisfying version of secular spiritual health in the modern world without facing up to the moral and psychological implications of his own interpersonal needs, problems, and responsibilities. The final chapter reveals, however, an unusually encouraging "avuncular" attitude toward the reader of the poetry, which may be felt to redeem Stevens from the alienation observed earlier. Halliday develops his views by way of comparisons between Stevens and other poets, especially Thomas Hardy, Emily Dickinson, Robert Frost, and John Ashbery. Originally published in 1991. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Despite the density of subject matter, this book is unusually absorbing, filled with suggestive insights and analyses. Halliday shows a sensitive, level-headed appreciation of the self-centered (even solipsistic), enigmatic poet-insurance executive, and he relates Stevens to poets with common elements of outlook and subject matter: Hardy, Wordsworth, Dickinson, Yeats, Frost, Ashbery. Halliday, bothered by Stevens's having ignored or denied interpersonal relations in his poetry, examines it for "tantalizing glimpses" of the reality of those relations, making the reader aware of Stevens's "failure to deal with something": human suffering, "the humanity of desirable women, the sheer presence of others." The chapters on "Stevens and Heterosexual Love" and "Stevens on Solitude" are intriguing. Regarding the former: Stevens's having chosen to shut his wife out of his life, his glamorizing of hypothetical or idealized females is understandable. Regarding the latter, Halliday considers four kinds of solitude in Stevens's poems: physical, emotional, ontological, and cosmic. Noteworthy too is Halliday's description of strategies literary devices Stevens used for avoiding "vivid perception of other persons," particularly when they are suffering: merging, blurring, fatalistic foreseeing, miniaturing others. Enthusiastically recommended.-S. I. Bellman, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona

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