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Shelleyan Eros : The Rhetoric of Romantic Love.

By: Ulmer, William A.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Princeton Legacy Library: Publisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, 2014Copyright date: ©2014Description: 1 online resource (202 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781400861385.Subject(s): Love in literature | Love poetry, English -- History and criticism | Shelley, Percy Bysshe, -- 1792-1822 -- Criticism and interpretationGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Shelleyan Eros : The Rhetoric of Romantic LoveDDC classification: 821/.7 LOC classification: PR5442.L6 -- U46 1990Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Contents.
Summary: In this work William Ulmer boldly advances our understanding of Shelley's concept of love by exploring eros as a figure for the poet's political and artistic aspirations. Applying a combination of deconstructive, historicist, and psychoanalytic approaches to six major poems, Ulmer follows the logic of the writing's rhetoric of love by tracing links between such elements as imagination, eros, metaphor, allegory, mirroring, repetition, death, and narcissism. Ulmer takes the mutual desire of self and antitype as a paradigm for rhetorical and social relations throughout Shelley and, in a significant departure from critical consensus, argues that his poetics were predominantly idealist. Ulmer demonstrates how the idealism of Shelleyan eros centers on a symbiosis of contraries organized as a dialectical variation of metaphor. In so doing, he contends that this idealism is both a rhetorical construct and revolutionary agency, and traces the failure of Shelley's visionary humanism to the gradual emergence of contradictions latent in his idealism. What emerges are new readings of individual texts and a reconsideration of the poet's imaginative development. Originally published in 1990. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.
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PR5442.L6 -- U46 1990 (Browse shelf) http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=1700436 Available EBC1700436

Cover -- Contents.

In this work William Ulmer boldly advances our understanding of Shelley's concept of love by exploring eros as a figure for the poet's political and artistic aspirations. Applying a combination of deconstructive, historicist, and psychoanalytic approaches to six major poems, Ulmer follows the logic of the writing's rhetoric of love by tracing links between such elements as imagination, eros, metaphor, allegory, mirroring, repetition, death, and narcissism. Ulmer takes the mutual desire of self and antitype as a paradigm for rhetorical and social relations throughout Shelley and, in a significant departure from critical consensus, argues that his poetics were predominantly idealist. Ulmer demonstrates how the idealism of Shelleyan eros centers on a symbiosis of contraries organized as a dialectical variation of metaphor. In so doing, he contends that this idealism is both a rhetorical construct and revolutionary agency, and traces the failure of Shelley's visionary humanism to the gradual emergence of contradictions latent in his idealism. What emerges are new readings of individual texts and a reconsideration of the poet's imaginative development. Originally published in 1990. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Distinctively, this book uses controversial approaches to produce an argument with traditional conclusions, which involve the poet's idealism. This book cites alike Jerrold E. Hogle's poststructuralist Shelley's Process (1988) and Stuart M. Sperry's Shelley's Major Verse (CH, Feb'89), an important book using traditional methods. Ulmer writes of the "association of love and language," and he argues that Shelley's work is idealist rather than skeptical, devoted to closure rather than Hogle's notion of "transference." Ulmer observes that Shelley's poetry "internalizes the hierarchical structures and institutional violence endemic to Western culture" but that Alastor "banishes politics in order to concentrate on psychological and rhetorical issues." Chapters on The Revolt of Islam, Prometheus Unbound, The Cenci, Epipsychidion, and The Triumph of Life discuss "the alliance of power and sexuality," the link between "sexuality and language," and "language as an instrument of oppression." With notes (but not bibliography) and index, this book is recommended for research libraries. -T. Hoagwood, Texas A & M University

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