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Court and Country Politics in the Plays of Beaumont and Fletcher.

By: Finkelpearl, Philip J.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Princeton Legacy Library: Publisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, 2014Copyright date: ©2014Description: 1 online resource (273 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781400860722.Subject(s): Authorship -- Collaboration -- History -- 17th century | Beaumont, Francis, -- 1584-1616 -- Criticism and interpretation | Country life in literature | Courts and courtiers in literature | Fletcher, John, -- 1579-1625 -- Criticism and interpretation | Political plays, English -- History and criticismGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Court and Country Politics in the Plays of Beaumont and FletcherDDC classification: 822/.309358 LOC classification: PR2434 -- .F53 1990Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Contents -- Introduction.
Summary: The seventeenth-century English collaborative authors Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher were not only the most popular playwrights of their day but also literary figures highly esteemed by the great critics of the age, Jonson and Dryden. Concentrating on the passions of the royalty and high nobility in a courtly atmosphere, their dramas are now usually seen as epitomizing a decadent turn in theater at the end of the Jacobean period. Philip Finkelpearl sets out to change this view by revealing the subtle political challenges contained in the plays and by showing that they criticize rather than exemplify false values. The result is a wholly new conception of this pair of dramatists and of the entire question of the relationship between the Crown and the theater in their time. Finkelpearl presents new biographical material revealing that Beaumont and Fletcher had good and sufficient reasons to be critical of the court and the king, and he shows that their most important works--especially The Knight of the Burning Pestle, Philaster, A King and No King, and The Maid's Tragedy have such criticism as a central concern. Court and Country Politics in the Plays of Beaumont and Fletcher offers much information on the nature of the "public" and "private" theaters at which these plays were presented and on Jacobean censorship. The book is an impressive explanation of why Beaumont and Fletcher were a central force in the Age of Shakespeare. Originally published in 1990. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access toSummary: the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.
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PR2434 -- .F53 1990 (Browse shelf) http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=1700502 Available EBC1700502

Cover -- Contents -- Introduction.

The seventeenth-century English collaborative authors Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher were not only the most popular playwrights of their day but also literary figures highly esteemed by the great critics of the age, Jonson and Dryden. Concentrating on the passions of the royalty and high nobility in a courtly atmosphere, their dramas are now usually seen as epitomizing a decadent turn in theater at the end of the Jacobean period. Philip Finkelpearl sets out to change this view by revealing the subtle political challenges contained in the plays and by showing that they criticize rather than exemplify false values. The result is a wholly new conception of this pair of dramatists and of the entire question of the relationship between the Crown and the theater in their time. Finkelpearl presents new biographical material revealing that Beaumont and Fletcher had good and sufficient reasons to be critical of the court and the king, and he shows that their most important works--especially The Knight of the Burning Pestle, Philaster, A King and No King, and The Maid's Tragedy have such criticism as a central concern. Court and Country Politics in the Plays of Beaumont and Fletcher offers much information on the nature of the "public" and "private" theaters at which these plays were presented and on Jacobean censorship. The book is an impressive explanation of why Beaumont and Fletcher were a central force in the Age of Shakespeare. Originally published in 1990. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to

the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In the 17th century the plays written, individually and as a team, by Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher rivaled in popularity and probably surpassed those of Shakespeare. But later readers have been far less generous to these playwrights: their drama has been seen as emptily sensationalizing, their political stance as abjectly pro-royalist. Now Finkelpearl (Wellesley), author of a first-rate book on the cantankerously critical poet-playwright John Marston (John Marston of the Middle Temple, CH, Apr'70), brings his unsurpassed knowledge of theatrical dissidence in Renaissance England to a full reconsideration of the lives and art of Beaumont and Fletcher. The result is a major book that reveals the sharp political thrust of such plays as Philaster and The Maid's Tragedy. This innovative and informed study gives experts much to chew over yet is accessible to advanced undergraduates. Finkelpearl's excellent jargon-free volume can stand as a model for the most fruitful use of historical evidence in literary analysis. Highly recommended for all academic collections. -E. D. Hill, Mount Holyoke College

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