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The Liberals and J. Edgar Hoover : Rise and Fall of a Domestic Intelligence State.

By: Keller, William W.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Princeton Legacy Library: Publisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, 2014Copyright date: ©2014Description: 1 online resource (230 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781400859887.Subject(s): Anti-communist movements -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Hoover, J. Edgar -- (John Edgar), -- 1895-1972 | Internal security -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Liberalism -- United States -- History -- 20th century | United States -- Politics and government -- 1945-1989 | United States. -- Federal Bureau of InvestigationGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Liberals and J. Edgar Hoover : Rise and Fall of a Domestic Intelligence StateDDC classification: 353.0074 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Contents -- Preface -- Abbreviations -- A Note on Sources -- 1. Domestic Security in a Modern Liberal State -- The Role of the FBI -- The State and Its Security: Three Models -- Autonomy and Insularity -- Status of the FBI -- 2. The Liberal Theory of Internal Security -- Politics of Emergency Detention -- The Liberal Theory -- Unintended Consequences -- 3. A Politics of Equivocation: The Liberals, the Klan, and Dr. King -- Dimensions of the White Hate Cointelpro -- Liberal Theory Revised-1964 -- The FBI and Civil Rights in the South -- Hoover Versus King -- 4. The End of the FBI-Liberal Entente -- Stage I: Uneasy Alliance -- Stage II: Increasing Alienation -- Stage III: "The Threat to Liberty" -- Dénouement -- 5. Rise of a Domestic Intelligence State -- Investigation, Infiltration, and Disruption -- Toward an Independent Security State -- 6. Conclusion -- Selected Bibliography -- Index.
Summary: In the super-heated anticommunist politics of the early Cold War period, American liberals turned to the FBI. With the Communist party to the left of them and McCarthyism to the right, liberal leaders saw the Bureau as the only legitimate instrument to define and protect the internal security interests of the state. McCarthyism provided ample proof of the dangers of security by congressional investigation. In response, liberals delegated extensive powers to J. Edgar Hoover--creating a domestic intelligence capacity that circumvented constitutional and legal controls. This balanced account of the link between liberal leaders in the United States and the growth of the FBI will appeal to a broad audience of readers interested in the American political climate. William Keller identifies a tension between liberalism and the security of the state that can never be fully resolved, and analyzes the exact mechanisms through which liberals and liberal government came to tolerate and even venerate an authoritarian state presence in their midst. The author shows how the liberal offensive against domestic communism succeeded both in weakening McCarthyism and in disabling the Communist party in the United States. What was the cost of these successes? Keller's answer assesses the liberal community's contribution to changes in the FBI between 1950 and 1970: its transformation into an independent, unaccountable political police. Originally published in 1989. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the richSummary: scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E743.5 -- .K35 1989 (Browse shelf) http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=1700582 Available EBC1700582
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E743 .L59 2008 From the New Deal to the New Right : E743 .P76 2016 The Progressives' century : E743 .W355 2008 Inventing the "American way" : E743.5 -- .K35 1989 The Liberals and J. Edgar Hoover : E743.5 -- .L56 2014 Little 'Red Scares' : E743.5 .D374 2014 Red apple : E743.5 .F476 2016 Spider web :

Cover -- Contents -- Preface -- Abbreviations -- A Note on Sources -- 1. Domestic Security in a Modern Liberal State -- The Role of the FBI -- The State and Its Security: Three Models -- Autonomy and Insularity -- Status of the FBI -- 2. The Liberal Theory of Internal Security -- Politics of Emergency Detention -- The Liberal Theory -- Unintended Consequences -- 3. A Politics of Equivocation: The Liberals, the Klan, and Dr. King -- Dimensions of the White Hate Cointelpro -- Liberal Theory Revised-1964 -- The FBI and Civil Rights in the South -- Hoover Versus King -- 4. The End of the FBI-Liberal Entente -- Stage I: Uneasy Alliance -- Stage II: Increasing Alienation -- Stage III: "The Threat to Liberty" -- Dénouement -- 5. Rise of a Domestic Intelligence State -- Investigation, Infiltration, and Disruption -- Toward an Independent Security State -- 6. Conclusion -- Selected Bibliography -- Index.

In the super-heated anticommunist politics of the early Cold War period, American liberals turned to the FBI. With the Communist party to the left of them and McCarthyism to the right, liberal leaders saw the Bureau as the only legitimate instrument to define and protect the internal security interests of the state. McCarthyism provided ample proof of the dangers of security by congressional investigation. In response, liberals delegated extensive powers to J. Edgar Hoover--creating a domestic intelligence capacity that circumvented constitutional and legal controls. This balanced account of the link between liberal leaders in the United States and the growth of the FBI will appeal to a broad audience of readers interested in the American political climate. William Keller identifies a tension between liberalism and the security of the state that can never be fully resolved, and analyzes the exact mechanisms through which liberals and liberal government came to tolerate and even venerate an authoritarian state presence in their midst. The author shows how the liberal offensive against domestic communism succeeded both in weakening McCarthyism and in disabling the Communist party in the United States. What was the cost of these successes? Keller's answer assesses the liberal community's contribution to changes in the FBI between 1950 and 1970: its transformation into an independent, unaccountable political police. Originally published in 1989. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich

scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Keller examines the unique, supportive relationship that existed between the FBI and America's liberal political establishment. He traces this history of mutual support from its inception during the anti-communist heyday of the 1950s, through its growth during the civil rights period of the 1960s, and its decline after 1970. Keller contends that liberal political leaders in Congress made common cause with J. Edgar Hoover during the '50s in order to remove the communist issue from the political sphere and keep conservatives from utilizing it as a partisan football. The FBI offered neutral bureaucratic ground for liberals to make an anti-communist statement of their own. This association increased during the civil rights era when the Ku Klux Klan initiated terrorist activities against blacks in the South to impede the progress of civil and voting rights legislation in 1964. The "FBI-Liberal Entente," as Keller calls it, came to an end in the late 1960s and early 1970s when the Bureau used its surveillance and intelligence techniques to infiltrate and harass the antiwar movement and civil rights organizations. This book offers a viewpoint that will be challenged by many. The text, however, is often tedious; the extensive accompanying footnotes are often more revealing. -S. K. Hauser, Milwaukee Area Technical College

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