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Change and Stability in Foreign Policy : The Problems and Possibilities of Detente.

By: Goldmann, Kjell.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Princeton Legacy Library: Publisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, 2014Copyright date: ©2014Description: 1 online resource (271 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781400859726.Subject(s): Detente | Germany (West) -- Foreign relations -- Soviet Union | International relations | Soviet Union -- Foreign relations -- Germany (West) | Soviet Union -- Foreign relations -- United States | United States -- Foreign relations -- Soviet UnionGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Change and Stability in Foreign Policy : The Problems and Possibilities of DetenteDDC classification: 327.1/12/0904 LOC classification: JZ5600 -- .G65 1988Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Contents -- 1. Foreign Policy Stability as a Research Problem -- Appendix: A Note on the Utility of Weak Theory and Weak Tests -- References -- Index.
Summary: Assume that a nation is pursuing a given foreign policy and that we are concerned with the way in which it will act in the future. We may want to make a forecast--but then to what extent is the present policy of a nation a valid guide to its future behavior? Or we may want to influence the nation to change its course--can we succeed? In other words, will the policy change or persist in the face of new conditions or negative feedback? Kjell Goldmann identifies the factors that may have an impact on whether a specific foreign policy is likely to endure or to change and develops them into a theory of foreign policy stability. He then uses this theory to explore the reasons why West German-Soviet detente during the 1970s proved to be more enduring than the improvement in relations between the United States and the Soviet Union. Finally, he outlines a hypothetical scenario for a fully successful process of detente stabilization and examines the extent to which this scenario is realistic. The book ends with some thought about how to conduct a policy aimed at stable detente with an adversary. Originally published in 1988. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.
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Cover -- Contents -- 1. Foreign Policy Stability as a Research Problem -- Appendix: A Note on the Utility of Weak Theory and Weak Tests -- References -- Index.

Assume that a nation is pursuing a given foreign policy and that we are concerned with the way in which it will act in the future. We may want to make a forecast--but then to what extent is the present policy of a nation a valid guide to its future behavior? Or we may want to influence the nation to change its course--can we succeed? In other words, will the policy change or persist in the face of new conditions or negative feedback? Kjell Goldmann identifies the factors that may have an impact on whether a specific foreign policy is likely to endure or to change and develops them into a theory of foreign policy stability. He then uses this theory to explore the reasons why West German-Soviet detente during the 1970s proved to be more enduring than the improvement in relations between the United States and the Soviet Union. Finally, he outlines a hypothetical scenario for a fully successful process of detente stabilization and examines the extent to which this scenario is realistic. The book ends with some thought about how to conduct a policy aimed at stable detente with an adversary. Originally published in 1988. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

One of the age-old problems facing analysts of the foreign-policy-making process is to determine under what conditions foreign policies change. Changes in the environment or decision makers' perceptions of the environment and changes in the values decision makers hope to attain seem to occur more frequently and with greater magnitude than shifts in policy. Since the former factors should be the primary determinants of policy, accounting for the relative stability in foreign policy is something of a puzzle. Goldmann (University of Stockholm) has written an interesting and thought-provoking book dealing with this problem. He proposes an analytical framework suggesting that pressures for foreign-policy change are mitigated by four general types of policy "stabilizers": international, cognitive, political, and administrative. Though the framework does not constitute a well-developed theory of the policy process (Goldmann is careful to point this out), it does serve to organize a number of arguments regarding policy change and to integrate a number of variables into a single, fairly comprehensive explanation. Goldmann illustrates the usefulness of the framework with an examination of the stability of the detente policies of West Germany, the Soviet Union, and the US. The book would be useful for advanced undergraduates or graduate students as an illustration of how to synthesize a large body of literature and is a useful supplement to many of the standard works in foreign-policy analysis. -T. C. Morgan, Rice University

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